Further research

This guide was last updated in 2009

Now is the time to place your ancestor in their context by asking further questions.

What were the medical and social attitudes of the day? Could your ancestor’s condition have been cured by modern medicine? How many other people suffered in the same way? Was their cause of death connected to the disability? What aids were available – would your ancestor have had a wheelchair or had access to Braille?

Was there any provision for them – a pension or allowance, for instance? Could they live independently, and what enabled this - family, charity, state help or sheer tenacity? How typical were their experiences? A little background reading can cast considerable light on your ancestor’s contemporary world.

Suggested links:

www.bfi.org.uk/education/teaching/disability/thinking/
www.learningdisabilityhistory.com/
www.cdp.org.uk/timeline.htm
www.turnaround.cdis.co.uk/weblog/files/8c743a4340266e739ca6471576a971a9-42.html

Suggested books:

Blind Jack of Knaresborough by Arnold Kellett (The History Press, 2008)

Charities and other organisations
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