WW1 casualty database reaches one million records milestone

By Jon Bauckham, 21 June 2018 - 5:13pm

A large number of entries from the War Office's daily and weekly casualty lists can be now be viewed on Forces War Records

Convalescent soldiers in Reading gather to read the latest wartime news, c1914 (Credit: Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)
Convalescent soldiers in Reading gather to read the latest wartime news, c1914 (Credit: Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

Over one million First World War casualty records are now available to explore on Forces War Records.

The military genealogy site's newly updated WW1 Casualty Records collection allows subscribers to track down details of British and Commonwealth soldiers who were injured on active service between 1914 and 1918.

Searchable by forename and surname, the entries will not only show the date on which the incident was recorded, but also reveal the soldier's rank, regiment, service number and an indication of whether they were entitled to wear a 'Wound Stripe' on their uniform.

Each entry in the collection also automatically links to the site's WW1 Troop Movements and ORBATS feature, which allows users to see where the soldier's unit was located at different stages of the conflict.

The records have been created using casualty lists compiled by the War Office, which were originally printed in newspapers such as The Times, Daily Telegraph, The Irish Times and The Scotsman.

In August 1917, it was decided that daily publication of the lists was having an adverse effect on public morale, at which point it was decided to publish them as an official weekly list by His Majesty's Stationery Office.

To create the online record set, Forces War Records carefully transcribed copies of the daily casualty lists printed in the Daily Telegraph, as well as a copy of the complete weekly lists held by the National Library of Scotland.

"[The casualty lists] must have had a huge impact on the lives of our ancestors, as often the quickest way to find out the fate of friends or family was to read them," Forces War Records web manager, Neil White, told Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine.

"The benefit of this unique collection is that it may contain the only record of a solider having been wounded if their service records were destroyed and they weren't discharged with a Silver War Badge.

"It gives new avenues of research into what might have been dead ends."

Details of soldiers who lost their lives during the First World War can be found within Forces War Records' separate Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914-1919 collection.
 

Genealogy news roundup: Ancestry releases millions of Scottish electoral records
previous news Article
University announces WW1 trauma project
next news Article
Genealogy news roundup: Ancestry releases millions of Scottish electoral records
previous news Article
University announces WW1 trauma project
next news Article
We use cookies to improve your experience of our website. Cookies perform functions like recognising you each time you visit and delivering advertising messages that are relevant to you. Read more here