Weekly round-up: Over 80,000 British Pathé films uploaded to YouTube

By Jon Bauckham, 24 April 2014 - 10:59am

More than 80,000 films dating back to the early 1900s have been made available to watch on YouTube.

British Pathé has uploaded its entire collection of newsreels to the video sharing website, providing viewers with around 3,500 hours of footage to explore.

Each clip is accompanied by a detailed description of its content, which ranges from bomb damage during the First World War (above), to lighter subjects such as sporting events, seaside holidays and the rather more unusual.

“Our hope is that everyone, everywhere who has a computer will see these films and enjoy them," said British Pathé’s general manager Alastair White.

"Whether you're looking for coverage of the Royal Family, the Titanic, the destruction of the Hindenburg, or quirky stories about British pastimes, it'll be there on our channel. You can lose yourself for hours.”
 

Show organisers seek readers with Scottish ancestry

The team behind Who Do You Think You Are? Live is looking for people to help promote its upcoming Scotland show, which is set to take place at Glasgow's SECC between 29-31 August 2014. If you've got Scottish kin and would like to feature in part of the marketing campaign, please email annie.dodd@immediate.co.uk. All those whose story is featured will win free tickets to the event.
 

WDYTYA? Magazine Forum to host live web chats

Researchers will soon have the chance to quiz leading family history experts, authors and genealogy organisations in a series of web chats on the Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine Forum. From next month users will be able to post their questions on a special thread, which the guest will then answer during an hourly session at the end of each week. First up on Friday 2 May is Ancestry.co.uk’s senior content manager Miriam Silverman, followed by Else Churchill from the Society of Genealogists on Friday 9 May. We’ll provide full details of how to get involved on the Forum homepage next week.
 

Building work starts at Nottinghamshire Archives

Nottinghamshire genealogists may find their research disrupted following the start of a £2.5 million project to refurbish the county’s main archives. First opened in 1993, the Nottinghamshire Archives building on Castle Meadow Road, Nottingham, is currently undergoing work to extend its strong room, meaning that certain collections will be unavailable to access. The facility will then close altogether in October until the project is complete in February 2015. For details of the closure and what researchers can expect from the new-look archives, click here.
 

Surnames project reaches major milestone

The largest ever study of UK surnames has reached a new milestone. A team of academics at University of the West of England in Bristol has now analysed 45,000 surnames and their origins, using sources dating back to the 11th century. The research will be published by Oxford University Press in 2016, providing detailed meanings of each name, its linguistic origin, geographic origin and distribution at the time of the 1881 census.
 

Michala Hulme discusses absent voters on radio

Genealogist Michala Hulme appeared on BBC Radio Lancashire yesterday afternoon to discuss the importance of the 1918 absent voters register for family historians – a document she also wrote about for the May edition of Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine. You can listen to her chat with presenter John Gillmore on the BBC iPlayer by clicking here (item begins at 03:08:02).

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Huguenot Heritage Centre receives £1.2 million grant
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Over 500,000 new parish records hit TheGenealogist
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