Genealogy news roundup: TheGenealogist adds Warwickshire parish records

By Rosemary Collins, 3 May 2018 - 2:36pm

Plus: Findmypast launches Surrey baptism collection; Scotland's first Jewish Heritage Centre to open; British Newspaper Archive adds Second World War submarine newspaper

ScotlandsPeople
The collection includes the 1773 marriage of actress Sarah Siddons

The names of over 1,270,000 individuals are available in new records added to TheGenealogist's Warwickshire parish records collection.

The new records include transcriptions and images of baptism, marriage and burial records and bring the total number of Warwickshire records on TheGenealogist to over two million.

The new records include the wedding of Sarah Kimble and William Siddons in Coventry on 25 November 1773.

Under her married name, Sarah Siddons became one of the most acclaimed actresses of the 18th century.

The Warwickshire records are also available on Ancestry, Findmypast and FamilySearch.

 

Findmypast launches Surrey baptism collection

Findmypast has added a new collection of transcriptions of 476,000 baptism records from 180 parishes in Surrey.

The records, which date from 1538 to 1901, were created by West Surrey Family History Society and include transcribed records of each child's baptism date, baptism place, birth date, the names of their parents, their parents' residence and occupations.

In addition, Findmypast announced that it has added PDFs of 12 historic publications about Scots-Irish immigrants in America.

 

Scotland's first Jewish Heritage Centre to open

The Scottish Jewish Heritage Centre, the first of its kind in the country, is due to open in summer 2019 after receiving a grant of £296,000 from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF).

The project, which will cost £465,000 altogether, will be housed in Garnethill Synagogue in Glasgow in partnership with the Scottish Jewish Archives Centre (SJAC).

The Centre will include a Scottish Holocaust-era Study Centre and a public display on the history and experience of refugees and survivors from the Nazi regime who found sanctuary in Scotland.

The project will also create computer-based resources, including a digital catalogue of around 2000 key items from the SJAC's Holocaust-era collections and digital access to the early editions of the weekly Glasgow-based Jewish Echo newspaper, dating from 1928 to 1945.

 

British Newspaper Archive adds Second World War submarine newspaper

Digitised issues of Good Morning, a newspaper printed during the Second World War for servicemen in the Royal Navy's submarine branch, are now available to search on the British Newspaper Archive (BNA).

The newspaper, which was launched in April 1943, was sent to ports in bundles of 30, placed on submarines and distributed to the sailors daily.

As well as including light news, humorous stories, cartoon strips and pin-up girls, it featured news stories about the seamen's families at home, accompanied by photographs.

The BNA is publishing Good Morning as part of its partnership to digitise the Trinity Mirror Newspaper Archive.

 

Virtual Genealogical Society launches

A new genealogical society designed to bring family historians together online has launched.

The USA-based Virtual Genealogical Society (VGS) describes itself as "a forum for genealogists to connect, network, and mentor with genealogists around the world through monthly meetings online, webinars, social networking, annual conferences, and in-person meet-ups at conferences, institutes and events around the world".

Membership costs $20 a year, with benefits including 24/7 access to the Members-Only section of the website, recorded monthly webinars by well-known genealogists, and access to the VGS monthly newsletter and members Facebook group.

The VGS also announced that it will hold its first conference from 1 to 3 November 2019. 

 

Biggleswade History Society complete First World War project

All the men and women from the Bedfordshire town of Biggleswade who served in the First World War have been commemorated by Biggleswade History Society.

The society has announced the successful completion of its First World War project to research all the 771 individuals who served in the war, including those who died and survived.

An alphabetical index of their names and dates is available for free on the society's website.

Researchers can contact the society to order an email or print copy of the folder of information for each individual, including BMD certificates, census and absent voter records, military records and newspaper articles, for a small fee.

 

NEHGS releases database of Massachusetts probate records

The New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) has announced a new database of probate records from Norfolk County, Massachusetts between 1793 and 1877.

The database was created through a partnership with the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Archives and contains records of 20,904 probate cases.

The cases include wills, guardianships, administrations, and various other types of probate records, but not adoptions, which are not public records in Massachusetts.

The index of records is available to search for free, while NEHGS members can download record images.

 

Museum of the Year shortlist announced

Five UK museums and art galleries have been selected as finalists for the Art Fund Museum of the Year Award 2018, the world's largest museum prize.

The finalists are The Postal Museum in London, Glasgow Women's Library, Brooklands motorsport and aviation museum in Weybridge, Ferens Art Gallery in Hull and the Tate Art Gallery in St Ives.

The winner will be announced at a ceremony at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London on 5 July and will receive £100,000, while the shortlisted museums will receive £10,000 each.

Stephen Deuchar, director of the Art Fund, said the five museums had "tapped into very current concerns", including studying women's equality, inspiring the next generation of engineers and the history of the postal service as an early social network.

 

What are the risks of using DNA websites in criminal investigations?
previous news Article
Ancestry adds 1939 Register to its collections
next news Article
What are the risks of using DNA websites in criminal investigations?
previous news Article
Ancestry adds 1939 Register to its collections
next news Article
We use cookies to improve your experience of our website. Cookies perform functions like recognising you each time you visit and delivering advertising messages that are relevant to you. Read more here