Genealogy news roundup: ScotlandsPeople adds new birth, marriage and death records

By Editor, 18 January 2018 - 10:54am

Plus: Over 79,600 PDF 'certificates' ordered as GRO extends pilot; Local historians appeal for descendants of Waltham Forest First World War casualties; TheGenealogist expands Warwickshire parish records collection

ScotlandsPeople
New additions to ScotlandsPeople may reveal more recent family members

ScotlandsPeople has carried out its annual statutory release of records, as thousands of birth, marriage and death records can now be made available to the public.

The newly released records consist of 106,469 births from 1917; 47,514 marriages from 1942; and 59,729 deaths from 1967.

The records reflect the forces shaping society at the time. For example, 1917 was the lowest year for births since 1856 owing to the disruption of family life by the First World War, and the 1942 records include Scottish women who married Norwegian, Polish and Canadian servicemen stationed in the country.

ScotlandsPeople is the official records website for the Scottish government, with family history records available in exchange for credits.
 

Over 79,600 PDF 'certificates' ordered as GRO extends pilot

The General Register Office (GRO) has confirmed that its latest pilot scheme to deliver PDF copies of birth and death records has been a success and will be extended.

A GRO spokesperson told Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine that over 79,600 PDF applications had been processed in the three months from the introduction of the pilot on 12 October 2017.

They added that the pilot scheme would be extended past the minimum three month period, and “further changes” would be “communicated in due course”.

The pilot scheme applies to births from 1837 to 1916 and deaths from 1837 to 1957, but excludes marriage records.

Over 79,600 PDF 'certificates' ordered as GRO extends pilot

Local historians appeal for descendants of Waltham Forest First World War casualties

A group of local historians from Waltham Forest are appealing for descendants of the First World War casualties buried in the borough’s cemeteries to share their family stories.

There are 411 First World War casualties buried in six cemeteries in Waltham Forest, which comprises the old boroughs of Leyton and Leytonstone, Walthamstow and Chingford, mainly injured service personnel who were brought home for treatment and died in Britain. They also include a member of the Women’s Royal Air Force (WRAF).

Malcolm Doolin of the East London Branch of the Western Front Association told Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine that he and the other project organisers were trying to “find the home stories” that shed light on the men’s brief lives.

He wants to present the information he uncovers about the soldiers’ lives at an event on 15 September.

In addition, Cllr Roy Berg of Waltham Forest council is looking for next of kin of the victims of both wars buried in Chingford Mount Cemetery to take part in a commemoration ceremony with local schoolchildren on 9 November in the run-up to Remembrance Day.

To contact Mr Doolin, email malcolm@astraeducation.com. To contact Cllr Berg, email royjberg@ntlworld.com.
 

TheGenealogist expands Warwickshire parish records collection

Family history subscription website TheGenealogist has added 366,260 individuals to its Warwickshire parish records collection, bringing the total to 934,495 records and images.

The new additions, released in partnership with Warwickshire County Record Office, include baptism, marriage and burial records dating back to the 16th century. 

One of the most notable people in the new records is Nicholas Brome, lord of the manor in Baddesley Clinton, who was buried on 10 October 1517.

Records show that Brome killed two men in his lifetime – once when he killed his own father’s murderer and once when he killed a priest who he suspected of having an affair with his wife. Both times, however, he received no punishment other than being ordered to pay compensation.
 

MyHeritage DNA unveils major updates and improvements

MyHeritage has announced a range of updates and improvements to its DNA matching service.

The changes made include increasing the number of reference genomes used to identify matches more than tenfold, using a better algorithm to eliminate false positives in the phasing stage of DNA matches, and lowering the minimum threshold for a shared match.

As a consequence, MyHeritage users will receive more accurate DNA Matches, about 10 times as many DNA Matches and more specific and accurate relationship estimates.

MyHeritage also introduced a Chromosome Browser to its online service, allowing users to view their shared DNA segments with a matched individual.
 

Willesden Jewish Cemetery receives £1.7 million Heritage Lottery Fund grant

Willesden Jewish Cemetery has been successful in its bid for a £1.7 million grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund to create greater public access at the historic site.

Read the full story here

The funding will be used for a three-year project, starting in spring 2018, including converting the entrance lodge into a visitor welcome centre, conservation of the original Prayer Hall and linked funerary buildings, and guided walks, talks, films, signage, maps and a website to tell the story of the cemetery and the people buried there.

The 21-acre cemetery opened in 1873 and holds over 26,000 graves, including those of famous people such as Lionel de Rothschild, the UK’s first Jewish MP; his son Nathan, the first Jewish peer; and Rosalind Franklin, the co-discoverer of DNA.

The United Synagogue, which owns and operates Willesden Cemetery, is also encouraging descendants of those buried in the cemetery to get in contact.

Over 79,600 PDF 'certificates' ordered as GRO extends pilot
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Over 79,600 PDF 'certificates' ordered as GRO extends pilot
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