Genealogy news roundup: Findmypast adds Lancashire parish records

By Rosemary Collins, 26 July 2018 - 1:33pm

Plus: FIBIS indexes 1842 Bombay Times arrival and departure notices; International Bomber Command Centre seeks volunteers to help with UK memorials database; Application deadline extended for family history TV series

Lancashire parish records on Findmypast
The new Findmypast collection includes over 1.1 million baptism records

Lancashire has become the latest county to feature in Findmypast's collection of UK parish records, with the website digitising over 4.5 million records from Lancashire Archives.

The new searchable collection consists of over 1.1 million baptism records covering 191 parishes across the county; 713,000 banns and marriage records from 194 parishes; and 712,000 burial records from 123 parishes.

The records date from 1538, when legislation was introduced requiring Church of England parishes to keep records of important events, to 1917 for baptisms, 1932 for banns and marriages, and 1991 for burials.

Many of the records are also available in Ancestry's collection of 1754-1936 Lancashire parish records, or transcribed for free on FamilySearch.

 

FIBIS indexes 1842 Bombay Times arrival and departure notices

The Families in British India Society (FIBIS) has continued its project to transcribe historic arrival and departure notices from the Bombay Times, with the latest records covering 1842.

The records cover 3,851 arrivals and 1,884 departures recorded in the paper, and allow family historians to trace their ancestors' movements in India as it came under the control of the British East India Company.

They were transcribed by volunteers and have been added to the free FIBIS database, which users can search for their ancestors by first name, surname, place and date.

 

International Bomber Command Centre seeks volunteers to help with UK memorials database

The International Bomber Command Centre (IBCC) is looking for volunteers to help create the first national database of Bomber Command memorials in the UK.

Tony Hibberd, IBCC memorials archivist, said there were "numerous" memorials, many located inside churches and other places with limited access, that he was unable to visit in person.

However, he explained that local volunteers could be "ideally positioned" to help by taking images of the memorials.

For more information, email info@internationalbcc.co.uk.

 

Application deadline extended for family history TV series

Renegade Pictures has extended the deadline for applying to appear in its new family history TV series to Monday 6 August 2018.

The production company is seeking members of the public who are interested in using DNA testing to solve questions about their immediate family for the unnamed series.

This could include finding out the identity of a birth parent, siblings, grandparents or cousins.

To apply, fill out the form on Renegade Pictures' website.

 

Reclaim the Records publishes New Jersey Death Index

Over one million death records from the US state of New Jersey are now available in a free online database operated by campaign group Reclaim the Records.

Reclaim the Records, a not-for-profit group which uses US Freedom of Information laws to force government agencies and archives to make genealogical record sets publicly available, obtained the records after submitting an Open Public Records Act (OPRA) request to the New Jersey Department of Health.

They received about half of the New Jersey death index records from 1920-1924 and all from 1925-1929 and 1949-2017, whilst the other records are missing.

Reclaim the Records has launched a new website, New Jersey Death Index, with a searchable database containing over 1.2 million records from 2001 to 2017 and digital images of the older indexes, which contain over 500,000 names.

It is also working with the New Jersey State Archives to try to obtain copies of the missing data for 1904-1919, half of 1920-1924, and 1930-1948.

 

Diving project uncovers stories of 18th century shipwreck

Dives by maritime archaeologists have uncovered new artefacts from the Rooswijk, a Dutch ship wrecked on Goodwin Sands in Kent in January 1740.

The remains of the Rooswijk are the property of the Dutch government but are managed by Historic England as a protected wreck site.

Excavations began on the wreck last summer. The latest dives, carried out as part of the #Rooswijk1740 project, have uncovered silver coins which were not in the ship's official cargo, suggesting the crew was smuggling it illegally, and tibia belonging to two of the 237 men who died in the wreck.

Meanwhile, Dutch genealogists have identified several of these men, including Gerrit Hendrik Huffelman, a senior surgeon, and Thomas Huijdekoper, a 19-year-old on his first sea voyage.

Members of the public will be able to see finds from the ship and meet experts from the project at an Open Weekend on 11 and 12 August at Ramsgate Warehouse.

 

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