Genealogy news round-up: Free Tipperary record resource launches online

By Jon Bauckham, 26 May 2016 - 3:26pm

Plus: ONS publishes 2021 Census consultation response; Lancashire Archives slashes opening hours; Yorkshire collection finds new home; Westminster records go online

Tipperary Studies

Researchers with roots in the Irish county of Tipperary could break down brick walls with help from a digital resource created by the region's local history library.

Launched on Saturday 21 May, the new Tipperary Studies website provides online access to a wealth of historic records held by the library, including rate books for the Poor Law Unions of Cashel, Nenagh and Thurles (1840s-70s) and Irish Tourist Association Reports (1942-45) for the county’s parishes.

Digitisation of the material, which is set to continue, has been funded by donations the library received throughout 2014 and 2015.
 

ONS publishes 2021 Census consultation response

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has published its response to a major public consultation on topics to be covered in the 2021 Census for England and Wales. Launched in 2015, the consultation attracted over 1,000 responses from organisations and individuals with an interest in census data, including family historians. However, some researchers – such as LostCousins website founder Peter Calver – have already voiced their disapproval at the ONS report, which suggests that a question asking people to list their birthplaces will not be included in the census. 
 

Lancashire Archives slashes opening hours

Family historians planning to visit Lancashire Archives may have to revise their plans following significant cuts to opening hours. Due to county council budget restrictions and a drop-off in visitor numbers over the past decade, public access to the archives has now been reduced from 42.5 to 30 hours per week. However, following the results of a public consultation, the facility will now be open until 7pm on the second Tuesday of each month. For full details, click here.
 

Unique Yorkshire archive collection finds new home

A unique collection of manuscripts, archives and books relating to Yorkshire’s history has been acquired by the University of Leeds. The Yorkshire Archaeological and Historical Society Collection (YAHS) – regarded as being the largest single resource for research on the county’s past outside the British Library – has been entrusted to the University’s Special Collections on a long-term loan. The archive fills more than 550 metres of shelving and includes rare documents such as the Wakefield Court Rolls, which were added to the UNESCO Memory of the World Register in 2011. 
 

Over 1.4 million Westminster records go online

Over 1.4 million historic records held by the City of Westminster Archives Centre have been digitised and uploaded to Findmypast. Available via the website’s fast-growing Westminster Collection, the new additions include baptism, marriages and burial registers from more than 50 historic local churches, including St Martin-in the-Fields and St Paul’s Covent Garden. Explore here (requires credits or subscription).
 

Findmypast marks 'Tree Challenge' week

As well as releasing a new tranche of Westminster Records (see above), Findmypast has also launched its first ever Tree Challenge week – an initiative to encourage researchers to use the site’s family tree-building tools. To promote the campaign, all record hints are free to access until midnight on Monday 30 May, while the site is also running a competition to win a bundle of family history goodies – including a 12-month subscription to Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine. Find out more here.

TV and Radio highlights: 27 May – 2 June 2016
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TV and Radio highlights: 27 May – 2 June 2016
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Genetic marker reveals descendants of medieval king
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