Ancestry to fund The Secrets in My Family TV series

By Rosemary Collins, 8 May 2017 - 10:17am

The series will use DNA testing to find out more about family history


The One Show's Alex Jones will present The Secrets in My Family (Credit: Jeff J Mitchell)

The Secrets in My Family, a new TV series co-funded by family history company Ancestry, is to air on W later this year.

The series consists of six hour-long episodes and will be presented by The One Show’s Alex Jones. It will feature ordinary members of the public using Ancestry’s DNA test to solve family mysteries and uncover secret family members.

Ancestry funded The Secrets in My Family in partnership with W’s parent company UKTV, which also owns commercial channels including Dave, Gold and Yesterday.

Boundless, which will produce the show, has previously created successful documentary series such as The Apprentice, Escape to the Country and Great British Railway Journeys.

DNA testing plays an increasingly important role in family history, with the first DNA test on Who Do You Think You Are? used by former Olympian Colin Jackson in 2006.

Sue Moncur, Ancestry’s UK Country Manager, said: “Ancestry uses family history and the science of genomics to help people better understand themselves and how we are all connected, so a show like The Secrets in My Family is the perfect platform for us to demonstrate how we solve mysteries and bring people together.”

Hannah Wyatt, managing director of Boundless, said that the series would “shine a light on some long-kept secrets and hopefully create new starts for all the families involved”.

The Secrets in My Family was ordered by Steve North, general manager of W, and Richard Watsham, UKTV’s director of commissioning. It was then brokered by Moncur, Wyatt, UKTV's director of commercial partnerships Sally Quick, Samantha Glynne, vice president of branded entertainment at Boundless’ parent company Fremantle.

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