Page 1 of 2

Else Churchill (Society of Genealogists)

PostPosted: Wed May 07, 2014 3:34 pm
by Jon Bauckham
Image

Re: Else Churchill (Society of Genealogists)

PostPosted: Thu May 08, 2014 12:38 pm
by Editor
Thank you for coming to answer questions from our forum users Else. I know the topic for discussion is going to be researching pre-1837 ancestors but I thought I would kick off the session by asking what are the benefits of belonging to the Society of Genealogists if you are based outside London?

Anyone wishing to ask questions about their research (or about the SoG) will need to post a reply on this thread. You can read our full guidelines here http://www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/forum/topic10614.html.

Thanks, come and join us tomorrow at 1pm.

Sarah

Re: Else Churchill (Society of Genealogists)

PostPosted: Thu May 08, 2014 2:53 pm
by Asher
My Norfolk ancestor travelled between Norwich and London, UK and Quebec on a regular basis between 1800 and the 1840's, as an emigration agent (according to posters advertising the ships passage)/tailor(BMD's and Canadian census records), before finally settling there. I have checked at the TNA and they do not have passenger lists for that period. How expensive would it have been to travel at that time with a young family and are there any other records that may give me some information about his role as an emigration agent.

Re: Else Churchill (Society of Genealogists)

PostPosted: Thu May 08, 2014 9:18 pm
by martinhallnotts
I wondered if you could suggest anything to help me overcome a bottleneck - my 6th g grandfather Thomas Jobb/Jobe was according to UK, Register of Duties Paid for Apprentices' Indentures, 1710-1811, an Innholder in Glandford Brigg, Lincolnshire around 1711; and his children (born around 1695 to 1703) as per the IGI were born in Wrawby, Lincolnshire. Sadly a fire in 1713 at Wrawby destroyed the older registers, and according to Phillimore's Atlas & Index the IGI contains Bishop Transcript entries for this parish and the neighbouring Yarborough parish 1561/1562 to 1837, however, there is nothing online on the IGI apart from the baptisms of his children. I've obtained copies of Thomas Jobb and his wife Mary's wills from Lincolnshire Archives, but am unable to find details of their marriage, her surname and either of them's birth, which I suspect would be around 1675. So any ideas would be most welcome!

Re: Else Churchill (Society of Genealogists)

PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2014 6:39 am
by edesy1984
Where do you recommend looking first when trying to trace ancestors before the 1841 census? And also how can you be sure you have the right ancestor with out the extra info a census normally gives you to confirm it?

Re: Else Churchill (Society of Genealogists)

PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2014 10:43 am
by Else SoG
Editor wrote:Thank you for coming to answer questions from our forum users Else. I know the topic for discussion is going to be researching pre-1837 ancestors but I thought I would kick off the session by asking what are the benefits of belonging to the Society of Genealogists if you are based outside London?

Anyone wishing to ask questions about their research (or about the SoG) will need to post a reply on this thread. You can read our full guidelines here http://www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/forum/topic10614.html.

Thanks, come and join us tomorrow at 1pm.

Sarah


Hi Sarah
Founded in 1911, the Society of Genealogists (SoG) is Britain’s oldest genealogical society and the National Family History Centre with a splendid library in London. In the digital age the Society appreciates that not everyone can come to London to use the library personally and hence the SoG is in the process and making many of its unique indexes and collections available to its members via it website.


Many of the Society’s unique indexes are online including Boyd’s Marriage Index with more than 7 million names, indexes of wills and marriage licences, apprentices and masters (1710-1774), Boyd’s Inhabitants of London as well as records such as the Bank of England will abstracts, Trinity House petitions and information on Teachers and Civil Servants. Recently the SoG uploaded its 300,000th image and datasets include nearly 12 million names. In addition to online indexes and finding aids the SoG Data Online includes PDFS of books from the library, family histories and many local sources. For example all the SoG’s pre 1840 printed Poll Books have been digitised and are online and members are creating an index database for them all.

SoG Data is made available to members as part if their annual subscription on its website with selected datasets also made available with commercial partners Findmypast.


The Society’s collections are particularly valuable for research before the start of civil registration of births marriages and deaths (in 1837 in England and Wales) but there is plenty for the beginner too.

The Society has many unique manuscript research notes and collections along with printed and unpublished family histories. Its library contains Britain’s largest collection of parish register copies and many nonconformist registers. Along with registers, the library holds local histories, copies of churchyard gravestone inscriptions, poll books, trade directories, census indexes and a wealth of information about the parishes where our ancestors lived.

If you can’t get into the library to look at material that’s not yet digitised and online (and as not all the items are out copyright we can’t digitise everything we hold) then my assistants can undertake a limited search/copy service. Members receive a discount on this service details of which can be found on the library pages of our website.

The Society of Genealogists holds regular study days, lectures and evening classes along with workshops demonstrating computer programs and databases of use to family historians. A diary of events and booking forms are available from the Society on 020 7553 3290 or on the website. We do plan to make some of these talks available online to members if we can.

Membership of the SoG is £50 per year (overseas membership is £32) plus a one-off joining fee of £10 which we are waving as a special offer to readers of WDYTYA? Magazine forum. Join online or download the application form from our website and quote IMC14 for the discount. (offer expires 30 June 2014)

Membership benefits and information about joining the Society can be found on its extensive website

Re: Else Churchill (Society of Genealogists)

PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2014 12:21 pm
by Else SoG
Asher wrote:My Norfolk ancestor travelled between Norwich and London, UK and Quebec on a regular basis between 1800 and the 1840's, as an emigration agent (according to posters advertising the ships passage)/tailor(BMD's and Canadian census records), before finally settling there. I have checked at the TNA and they do not have passenger lists for that period. How expensive would it have been to travel at that time with a young family and are there any other records that may give me some information about his role as an emigration agent.


Hi Asher

The SoG library contains a huge number of books relating to migration into Canada. We collect resources containing names such as published passenger lists along with general social history material. You can find these books listed on our catalogue by undertaking an advanced search on the subjects Canada AND migration. There will be much to learn from some of these titles

It seems the period 1820-1850 was an incredibly busy time for a shipping agent working in Canada. At a time of agricultural depression and unemployment and unrest it was deemed that the growing need for labour in the colonies should be met by the growing number of poor and unemployed in England.

Its difficult to say how much a transatlantic voyage at this time would have cost as literally thousands of migrants went to Canada, America and other colonies each year under what were known as assisted migration schemes paid for by local parishes, poor law unions and charities. And there were many companies and ships serving this trade and had offices in the ports on both sides of the Atlantic.

The most famous of these migration schemes (and there were many) was the Petworth project 1832-1837 and we have a very detailed book on this project which looks at the context and history of the schemes in general and is well worth reading. It's called Assisted Migration to Upper Canada - the Petworth Project by Wendy Cameron and Mary McDougall Maude, 2000. This is fascinating and gives great insight into how a shipping agent would have earned his money. Another useful title is British Emigration to British North America. The First Hundred Years by H I Cowan, Toronto University Press 1961 (the SoG doesn't have this)

Re: Else Churchill (Society of Genealogists)

PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2014 12:29 pm
by Else SoG
martinhallnotts wrote:I wondered if you could suggest anything to help me overcome a bottleneck - my 6th g grandfather Thomas Jobb/Jobe was according to UK, Register of Duties Paid for Apprentices' Indentures, 1710-1811, an Innholder in Glandford Brigg, Lincolnshire around 1711; and his children (born around 1695 to 1703) as per the IGI were born in Wrawby, Lincolnshire. Sadly a fire in 1713 at Wrawby destroyed the older registers, and according to Phillimore's Atlas & Index the IGI contains Bishop Transcript entries for this parish and the neighbouring Yarborough parish 1561/1562 to 1837, however, there is nothing online on the IGI apart from the baptisms of his children. I've obtained copies of Thomas Jobb and his wife Mary's wills from Lincolnshire Archives, but am unable to find details of their marriage, her surname and either of them's birth, which I suspect would be around 1675. So any ideas would be most welcome!


Hi Martin

The SoG has many of the publications, indexes and finding aids published by the Lincolnshire FHS. This society has started to produce its marriage index for the period 1600-1699 from surviving registers and BTs so its worth seeing if they have covered your area of interest yet or enquire with them how the project is getting on. I don't think that Lincolnshire FHS marriage indexes are yet online on any major genealogy website so you may have to look at their website for details and further information about obtaining their indexes if you cant get to the SoG in London

Of course if the relevant parish register hasn't survived then tracking down the marriage could be a challenge. There are no supplementary banns records for this period but if by chance your ancestors married by licence there may be a surviving record of the bond and allegations relating to that marriage licence. Again Lancashire FHS has published an index to those and we have copies of the index in the library for the period 1629-1699

Re: Else Churchill (Society of Genealogists)

PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2014 12:52 pm
by Else SoG
edesy1984 wrote:Where do you recommend looking first when trying to trace ancestors before the 1841 census? And also how can you be sure you have the right ancestor with out the extra info a census normally gives you to confirm it?


Hello

Generally when you are researching before the census years you are reliant on records relating to the places where your ancestors lived or records relating to what they did or what happened in their lives. There is no single source before 1841 like the census or general registration which covers (or should cover) absolutely everyone in the country. Hence you have to use multiple records together and glean clues from them. Often these clues don't fit into tidy database fields on an online index so it is even more important when researching before 1841 that you check sources and original records rather than rely only on index entries or transcriptions. And not all of these sources are digitised and online so you may have to visit a local archive.

Records relating to place are of course the parish registers which record christenings, marriages and burials and which often show relationships and occasionally ages and occupations. These can be supplemented by marriage banns and licence records. Your ancestors may have left wills. They may have paid local rates and taxes. They may have been in receipt of local parish poor relief or had illegitimate children. It is only by using such records together that you build up the evidence of a person being alive in a certain place at a certain time who (without evidence to the contrary) is likely to be your ancestor. Get a sense of the places where your ancestors lived and keep sifting through sources for those places

Information from apprenticeships, local trade directories or occupational records may add to the picture

I personally have found that the recent digitisation of newspapers to have been remarkably helpful for looking for my rather poor and "ordinary" aglab ancestors. They were mentioned fleetingly as victims of petty crime, witnesses in serious crimes and even as prize winners in a local ploughing match. I have found one rare and precious one-line obituary of an ancestor which was very touching. All reported in the local paper before 1841.

You'll have to use your detecting skills to bring the evidence together. Good luck

Re: Else Churchill (Society of Genealogists)

PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2014 1:04 pm
by Editor
Thank you for coming onto our forum today and answering some questions Else. Remember if anybody is interested in joining the SoG, you can use the code mentioned above to save £10.

See you all next week at 1pm when Celia Heritage will be answering questions on death records.

Regards

Sarah