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Rupert Everett

Discuss last year's series of Who Do You Think You Are?, which featured Bruce Forsyth, Dervla Kirwan, Monty Don and six more famous faces as they traced their family trees

Re: Rupert Everett

Postby Roy Stockdill » Sat Jul 31, 2010 3:09 pm

The majority consensus among the serious researchers, i.e. professionals and experienced family historians, on the Rootsweb genealogy mailing lists is that this was one of the poorest episodes ever! In my own view, it was almost the worst apart from that featuring John Hurt in a previous series. It left unanswered far more questions that it answered, Everett came across as a thoroughly unpleasant snob and the research techniques shown were abysmal, especially in the search for Georgina Teague.

Nobody seems to have picked up on the fact, apart from me, that Everett is seemingly a direct descendant of Charles II and one of his most notorious mistresses, Barbara Villiers. See a website entitled "Famous descendants of William the Conqueror" and you will find Everett near the bottom of the page, just above Lady Diana Spencer.

Now, if that had been followed I would have found it more interesting, since Barbara Villiers was one heck of a character! She was married to somebody else when she became Charles II's mistress, had at least five children by him, was notoriously extravagant, foul-tempered and sexually promiscuous. Perhaps Rupert Everett should have been looking to her in his somewhat obsessive desire to explain his own nature?

Roy Stockdill
Professional genealogist, writer and lecturer, Hertfordshire
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Re: Rupert Everett

Postby ksouthall » Sat Jul 31, 2010 3:23 pm

Roy Stockdill wrote:Nobody seems to have picked up on the fact, apart from me, that Everett is seemingly a direct descendant of Charles II and one of his most notorious mistresses, Barbara Villiers. See a website entitled "Famous descendants of William the Conqueror" and you will find Everett near the bottom of the page, just above Lady Diana Spencer.


The "posh" side of Rupert Everett's ancestry has been discussed in other places but, as Rupert said at the start, he saw his background as mainly "toff", so the programme picked up on the story that did not conform with the rest of his ancestry.

As Barbara Villiers' story has been covered elsewhere, it was interesting for us amateurs to see the more humble side of his family.

We have seen plenty of royal ancestry recently, with Boris Johnson and Brooke Shields' programmes. Maybe the "professional genealogists" didn't like Rupert's programme but who cares? As they are professionals, why do they need to bother watching the show anyway as they don't need to pick up tips? Most of the people on this forum appear to have enjoyed it. I enjoyed it and will carry on watching the show as it is meant to be entertainment not a serious historical expose.
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Re: Rupert Everett

Postby Roy Stockdill » Sat Jul 31, 2010 3:53 pm

BARBARA VILLIERS, I believe, through her long relationship with Charles II which produced 5 children, was also an ancestress of Diana Princess of Wales, Fergie Duchess of York and Camilla Duchess of Cornwall.

Says it all, really, doesn't it? The royals and their relatives are all barking mad through so much inter-breeding! Could explain a lot about Rupert Everett, too.
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Re: Rupert Everett

Postby FamilyHistoryAddict » Sat Jul 31, 2010 11:03 pm

I totally agree with K Southall's last post and I don't agree that the worst WDYTYA programme was John Hurt. For me that award goes to Nigella Lawson - but what do I know? Not much according to some! ;)

I too was glad they didn't explore the royal connections in Rupert's tree - I'm royaled out!

Cheers, FHA
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Re: Rupert Everett

Postby scaniavespa » Mon Aug 23, 2010 8:02 am

This episode really made me sit up and take notice, I have an ancestor who was in the Farningham Home for Little Boys at the exact time of Ruperts ancestor. Can anyone please tell me how I can get access to the register books they showed. I have tried emailing the BBC for contact with Malcolm Scott the expert who showed Rupert the books but have had no reply. Would be gratefull if anyone could point me in the right direction.

Thank you
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Re: Rupert Everett

Postby ksouthall » Mon Aug 23, 2010 1:55 pm

scaniavespa wrote:This episode really made me sit up and take notice, I have an ancestor who was in the Farningham Home for Little Boys at the exact time of Ruperts ancestor. Can anyone please tell me how I can get access to the register books they showed. I have tried emailing the BBC for contact with Malcolm Scott the expert who showed Rupert the books but have had no reply. Would be gratefull if anyone could point me in the right direction.

Thank you


I don't know how to help you get to see the records at Farningham, however your post highlights one of the main benefits of the programme. Even though the research is laid out on a plate for the celebrities, it gives us the chance to discover new records that may help us in our search.

Hopefully saniavespa will be able to follow in Rupert's footsteps and find out about an ancestor too.
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Re: Rupert Everett

Postby ksouthall » Sat Sep 11, 2010 4:35 pm

I watched a repeat of the Rupert Everett programme last night and, having now seen most of the series, think that I enjoyed the Rupert Everett one the most this year. I thought the stories were good and that Rupert was very enthusiastic about the whole process. It also avoided links to the aristocracy and royalty and covered themes that have not really been covered elsewhere in the series.

I hope the Alan Cumming episode provides a grand finale to the series.
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Re: Rupert Everett

Postby clarksclerks » Tue Jan 18, 2011 9:50 pm

We saw the Rupert Everett episode last night (in Australia) and thought it was most disappointing. The story was potetially fascinating but for us the programme was ruined by Rupert's appalling ignorance, arrogance and snobbery. Never before have we seen an episode where we ended up disliking the person so much. If he's an example of the British upper classes it made us realise why we emigrated!
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Re: Rupert Everett

Postby cromarty » Thu Jan 20, 2011 11:27 pm

We found Rupert Everett to be a very sad and seemingly deeply troubled individual.

It was so sad watching Rupert with his mother - there did not appear to be any warmth there at all.

Rupert seemed happy when he found something financially good, but surmised a lot about his family's history and what actually happened. Rupert is very concerned about class and found some of his comments quite degrading when referring to people.

There were a lot of unanswered questions especially the search for Georgina Teague.

He needs a lot more "Aunt Marguerite's" in his life!!
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Re: Rupert Everett

Postby Grace12 » Tue Jun 28, 2011 11:23 pm

During this program a photograph was shown of the founders of the boys home one of which was an A O Charles and more recently I purchased a copy of the magazine which had a piece on Rupert which reminded me that I had intended to follow this up. I have an A O Charles who was executor of the will of one of my ancestors, James Ramshaw (d 1855 age 82). INSPIRED to look into my A O Charles and whether he was the same man I have done some further research.
James Ramshaw had a daughter Ellen who married Joseph Charles (17 Aug 1826 St Dunstan in the West) and their son was Albert Onesiphorous Charles (bapt 04 Jan 1831 St Dunstan in the West). Researching The Times Online I found advertisements for the 'Little Boys Home', each advert trying to raise funds and listing other benefactors. The adverts appeared several times each year, always with A O Charles given as the secretary to whom the monies should be sent. In Feb 1888 he places a more desperate plea for funds from The Times readers as ' no more debt can be incurred'. In May of 1888 a memorial fund is set up by the commitee to raise money for A O Charles' wife and family. Checking the deaths for this period I found that Albert Onesiphorus Charles died in March Quarter of 1888. He was 57. There are no other A O Charles that fit this time frame so I can positively say that Albert Onesiphorus was the A O Charles, founder and fund raiser. With his date of death I was able to track down an obituary (Though the use of 'Little AND Boys AND Home' works better as a search than 'A O Charles'). I'm not sure why he never used the title 'Mr' or 'Rev' (patrons of the charity were the Prince & Princess of Wales, Chairman the Earl of Shaftesbury and a couple of 'Sirs' on the committee) or whether the stress of fund raising caused his death. Perhaps a descendent could persue that. He was my Gt Gt Grans cousin and judging by the amounts pledged to his memorial fund a popular fellow.

If you could let me know from where I could obtain a copy of the photograph of the three patrons I would be most grateful

Deaths Mar 1888
CHARLES Albert Oncaiphorus 57 Lambeth 1d 356

Obituary
The Times, Saturday, Mar 31, 1888; pg. 9; Issue 32348; col F
http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itw/infom ... ep=surttda

The Plea
The Times, Monday, Feb 27, 1888; pg. 13; Issue 32319; col F
http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itw/infom ... ep=surttda

More usual request for monies
The Times, Friday, Jan 02, 1880; pg. 6; Issue 29767; col B
http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itw/infom ... ep=surttda
The Times, Monday, Apr 11, 1887; pg. 11; Issue 32043; col A
http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itw/infom ... ep=surttda

A fund raising banquet
The Times, Tuesday, Mar 01, 1887; pg. 12; Issue 32008; col C
http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itw/infom ... ep=surttda

List of people involved with the charity
The Times, Monday, May 06, 1872; pg. 17; Issue 27369; col A
http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itw/infom ... ep=surttda

A O Charles Memorial Fund
The Times, Monday, Apr 30, 1888; pg. 8; Issue 32373; col C
http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itw/infom ... ep=surttda
The Times Monday, May 07, 1888; pg. 10; Issue 32379; col C
http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itw/infom ... surttdaThe Times, Monday, May 28, 1888; pg. 8; Issue 32397; col C
http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itw/infom ... ep=surttda
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