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Victorian Pharmacy

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Victorian Pharmacy

Postby Annie08 » Thu Jul 15, 2010 8:36 pm

I've got this on at the moment. How interesting. I would'nt want to use lead for cuts or belladona. What would they think of our remedies we use today? I don't fancy the leeches either. I've visited Blists Hill Victorian Farm so again makes it more interesting. Shame it's only 4 episodes (Thursday BCC 2 9pm)

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Re: Victorian Pharmacy

Postby runmerry » Fri Jul 23, 2010 8:52 pm

I'm watching this with great interest too as I worked in a pharmacy for 28 years. Some of the old remedys weren't so bad in fact you can still get Belladonna Plasters today.

Jen
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Re: Victorian Pharmacy

Postby Guy » Sat Jul 24, 2010 5:53 am

Many of the “cures” available today are just as toxic as the ones used in Victorian times.

Botox (botulinum toxin) a powerful neurotoxin often caused poisoning by growing in improperly handled or prepared meat products.

Codeine could be described as a refined laudanum as both have a base of opium.

Fillings for teeth until recently contained a high proportion of Mercury in the amalgam even though it is very toxic. It is (was) commonly used as a preservative for vaccines. Another use is/was as an antiseptic for cuts and scrapes and even as a laxative.

Most medicines work because they are toxic; the trick is to dilute the toxicity enough to weaken the disease before they weaken the host.
Cheers
Guy
As we have gained from the past, we owe the future a debt, which we pay by sharing today.
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Re: Victorian Pharmacy

Postby Annie08 » Sun Jul 25, 2010 7:45 pm

I've just bought the book to accompany the series. Very interesting. How many remedies we do still use now shows the test of time and we (me and Mum) still use some of them at home today and my Mum remembers using others when she was younger. Brilliant series.

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Re: Victorian Pharmacy

Postby Hampshire Hog » Mon Aug 16, 2010 4:13 pm

Even though many of todays medicines can be toxic and have unpleasant or even fatal side effects there is one difference which makes things a lot safer. We monitor reported side effects and many new drugs don't even get to the market. What side effects we accept will depend on what we are using it to treat.
Drugs with nasty side effects are usually only used to treat more serious possibly life threatening conditions.
Today patients have a lot more information than they had in Victorian times.
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Re: Victorian Pharmacy

Postby dizzybint » Tue Sep 21, 2010 2:03 pm

I wrote on another thread about the Lock Hospital in Glasgow, it closed in 1956, and no one knew it even exisited, It was opened many years before to "care for " pregnant unmarried girls. girls with VD, children with VD and girls who were thought to be too provocative, Mercury baths were used to supposedly kil the diseases, all it killed were the girls.. most died of the treatment , very sad inhttp://special.lib.gla.ac.uk/exhibns/ ... htmldeed...
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Re: Victorian Pharmacy

Postby joe11 » Fri Oct 29, 2010 8:27 am

runmerry wrote:I'm watching this with great interest too as I worked in a pharmacy for 28 years. Some of the old remedys weren't so bad in fact you can still get Belladonna Plasters today.

Jen


Hi i am a new bee over bee ...i wanna know what is Belladonna Plasters .
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Re: Victorian Pharmacy

Postby paulberyl » Sun Oct 31, 2010 7:43 pm

Belladonna plasters are used to relieve muscular tension, stiff necks, aching shoulders, sciatica and back ache.

The plasters utilise foliage from belladonna plants that produce a natural relief for aches and pains. The foliage is pulped into a liquid base producing a belladonna extract containing alkaloids from the plant. These alkaloids are coated onto a soft cotton cloth, which nowadays is perforated to allow the skin to breathe.

The alkaloids extracted from the plant act as a counter irritant increasing the blood flow to the area under the plaster. This in turn generates heat to provide targeted warming relief for aches and pains.

Paul
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