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Publicans

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Re: Publicans

Postby ksouthall » Tue Jul 29, 2014 1:41 pm

No worries. I came across it by chance and remembered the surname. If you ever get chance to go there, The Six Bells is a nice proper village pub. I'm surprised you picked up the post so quickly.
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Re: Publicans

Postby Big Andy » Wed Jul 30, 2014 1:42 pm

ksouthall wrote:I'm surprised you picked up the post so quickly.


Purely a fluke in the timing !

I have been to 'The Plough' at Upper Dicker and the 'Potters Arms' at Lower Dicker that were both pubs with Gutsell's as landlords in the past.

The last time I visited, 'The Plough' was still a flourishing pub but 'The Potters Arms' had been turned into a fast food place.

I understand that 'The Yew Tree' pub, which I believe is near Rype, was also run by a Gutsell at one time.

'The Six Bells' will make 4 pubs in the area run by Gutsells. Maybe they should have been referred to the monopolies commission ?!?
8-)

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Re: Publicans

Postby ksouthall » Wed Aug 27, 2014 12:05 am

"The Six Bells" was having some work done on it last month - possibly external painting or structural work, as there was scaffolding outside.

On another note, doing a search for my Gower family of Chiddingly, I found that someone has deposited notes which may be relevant with the Sussex Family History Group. There also appears to be some information on the Gutsell family. This is kept at The Keep, the new East Sussex Record Office. Here is a link to the SFHG catalogue:-

http://sfhg.org.uk/philcat4a.html

It mentions the following information:-

GUTSALL Gardner Collection
GUTSELL of Rye etc. Com. printout from 1691 by Alan & Dorothy MARTIN 1996 Digitised Computers

I can't tell if it connects to your family but thought you might be interested to know it was there.
ksouthall
 
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Re: Publicans

Postby Big Andy » Wed Aug 27, 2014 1:01 pm

ksouthall wrote:"

On another note, doing a search for my Gower family of Chiddingly, I found that someone has deposited notes which may be relevant with the Sussex Family History Group. There also appears to be some information on the Gutsell family. This is kept at The Keep, the new East Sussex Record Office.

I can't tell if it connects to your family but thought you might be interested to know it was there.


Thanks again for letting me know !

I have made contact with a Ron Gower, who has provided me with a lot of help. I suspect that it might be him.

Cheers.

Andy.
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Re: Publicans

Postby ksouthall » Wed Aug 27, 2014 1:03 pm

Big Andy wrote:I have made contact with a Ron Gower, who has provided me with a lot of help. I suspect that it might be him.

Cheers.

Andy.


Out of interest, is Ron Gower's family also from Chiddingly or is that just a coincidence? If so, I wonder if he is connected to my Gower family.
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Re: Publicans

Postby irishstreetlad » Sat Aug 30, 2014 7:57 pm

Hi Big Andy. I'm in The Plough at the moment. There is a notice on the wall about the history of the pub. There is no mention of a William Gutsell but it says a Thomas Gutsell was the licensee from 1849 until his death in 1873.
I've taken a photo of it and will do a transcript of it when I get home tomorrow.

Sent from my GT-I9300 using WDYTYA Forum mobile app
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Re: Publicans

Postby irishstreetlad » Sun Aug 31, 2014 8:28 pm

irishstreetlad wrote:Hi Big Andy. I'm in The Plough at the moment. There is a notice on the wall about the history of the pub. There is no mention of a William Gutsell but it says a Thomas Gutsell was the licensee from 1849 until his death in 1873.
I've taken a photo of it and will do a transcript of it when I get home tomorrow.

Sent from my GT-I9300 using WDYTYA Forum mobile app


Plough 1641

This inn known by the name and sign of the Plough was built in the 16th year
of Charles 1st, in 1641, though the original structure of the building has been
altered and added to down through the years, particularly during the reign of Victoria.
When first built the property was a farm building, consisting of a main tenement with stables and out buildings. In 1653, one Joseph Wooller, purchased the property from the trustees of the estate of a Maudestly Norville. In 1670
the same Joseph Wooller made it over in his will to his widow Sara, with the
addition of an extra stable and 32 pounds. Upon her death in 1674, the property passed to John, Daniel and Susan Norville. Their mother's bequest included not only
this cottage with its appurtenances, but several articles of linen, pewter
brass and a dornix of lace.
By 1690 the house was in the sole possession of John Norville. He died in
1703 and directed that his "tenement of messuage situated and being at Dicker, in the county of Sussex, with it's land, stables and all it contains therein, he said be sold to pay my depts and legacies". The property had originally held 12 acres of
land, but by the date of the transaction of his will, it had been reduced to 4,
so presumably John Norville had sold off the other 8 acres, between 1690 and 1703, possibly to cover depts. In the year of 1703, the house with it's remaining land
was purchased by Jacob Hotstone, a clothier of Hailsham.
He still lived in 1728, and presumably conducted his business from the house, however he died in 1731 and bequeathed the property to his wife Jemima, a haberdasher by trade. She died in 1743 and passed the property to her son David, however he has little benefit from his bequest for he died within a week of his mother in May 1743. He left no will and there were no apparent heirs, so the property appears to have been left empty for four years. In 1747, one Thomas Worsell, attorney, acting as trustee, sold the property to Samuel Hemsley,
a wheelwright and saddler from Dicker.

He lived there with his wife Clara and four children, she had originally bore him ten children, but as was usual of the times, not all of these survived the perils of infancy. She herself died in 1781 and Samuel Hemsley in March 1782.
He left the property to his eldest son James, who in 1783, stood before justices at Hailsham and gave two sureties of his good character to keep and orderly house , and under the terms of the licencing legislation act of 1552, was granted a licence to sell ales from his premises, which at first bore no title or registration other than that of an ale house at the Dicker and that the said Hemsley, a wheelwright and now
ale-seller, was of that house. However in 1794, after the house having prospered, Hemsley applied for and was granted a wine and spirit licence, and at the hearing he registered the house under the title of the "Plough", the address was given simply as the Dicker.

James Hemsley kept the "Plough" until his death in 1819, whereafter it passed to his widow Ruth, who ran it for a further two years. In 1821, she sold it to Jacob Ginner, a brewer and ship agent of Eastbourne. After carrying out alterations to the house, he leased it to John Goddard, an innkeeper of Eastbourne, who had for many years kept an inn there called the "Camb". He kept it until 1832,when he gave up the lease to William Savage, a boot and shoe-maker of Hertsmonceux. In 1841, he was succeeded by George Gates. He kept the "Plough" until 1849 when one Thomas Gutsell took over.

It was, whilst in his hands in 1863, that Mrs Elizabeth Ginner, widow of Jacob, sold the "Plough" and a number of other licenced houses, to James Burfield & Co, Brewers and Porter Merchants of the Phoenix Brewery, Courthouse Street, Hastings. They were at the time, agents for Reid & Co's London Stout and Porter ales. Thomas Gutsell kept the "Plough" until his death in 1873, whereafter his widow Mary took over until her death in 1879. In that year her son Samuel was granted an extension on the lease, and kept the house until his death in 1902, whereafter his son Edward took over.

He kept the house until 1908, giving it up in that year to Thomas Muzzlewhite who kept it until 1913, when he was succeeded by Charles Henry Willard and he in 1923, by David Gutsell, who was the son of Edward Gutsell, who gave up the house in 1908. Davis Gutsell was here for many years to follow. J & C Burfield eventually became part of the Reid & Co. Brewery and they eventually merged with Elliot Watney, to become part of Watney, Combe and Reid, of the Phoenix Brewery. In 1971, the Brewery sold the "Plough" as a Free House, which it remains to this day and is owned and kept by William and Georgina Tobin
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