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1841

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1841

Postby FamilyHistoryAddict » Mon Sep 17, 2007 10:26 pm

My paternal line caused me a problem straightaway in 1841. Found second great grandmother on the 1841 census at Wells Next the Sea, Norfolk, with the children; but second great grandfather was missing.

He wasn't dead and I think I've found him a few miles down the coast at Thornham, Norfolk staying at an inn - but what was he doing there? Was he working or had he gone to visit relatives at Thornham? He did have relatives there.

I don't think they had much leisure time in 1841 did they? So I suspect he was working. It's a question that will remain unanswered I expect. [sm=rolleyes.gif] I'm looking forward to learning more about 1841 from the magazine. I find it hard to use my imagination about this time in history; so will enjoy receiving clarification. I noticed on a recent trip to Dorset that Thomas Hardy was born in 1840 and my first thought was: He should show up on the 1841 census. I must look for him and envy him living in that lovely thatched cottage in rural Dorset. [:)]
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RE: 1841

Postby Gordie » Tue Sep 18, 2007 2:53 am

Hi Addict,

I expect we will never know why he was there but another possibilty could be he was on/had been on a journey somewhere. I was fortunate enough to have some quaker ancestors with a scribe amongst them. In his Diaries he talks of journeys he made to different towns, most of them made on foot, and consequently took quite a while. Each night he stayed in an Inn to rest and recouperate.

So different to the image we have of our ancestors being people who didn't really move away from their homes much!

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RE: 1841

Postby FamilyHistoryAddict » Tue Sep 18, 2007 3:10 am

Hi Gordie,

You're probably correct that he was resting before carrying on with his journey. Nowadays you can go by car to Wells Next the Sea from Thornham in about 15 - 20 minutes. It's a distance of about 10 miles. On foot it would take a lot longer but would be a pleasant walk along the coast path. I expect the Inn was a pub so he'd have been able to quench his thirst as well as rest his legs. [;)]

I must say I'm very impressed so far looking at the tasters of the 1841 information:

[link=http://www.bbcwhodoyouthinkyouare.com/index.php?page=census]http://www.bbcwhodoyouthinkyouare.com/index.php?page=census[/link]

My ancestors certainly moved about - many of them became Merchant Seamen and travelled a great deal.

Your Quaker ancestor's diary must be very interesting and give a good snapshot of life in those days.
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RE: 1841

Postby Gordie » Wed Sep 19, 2007 6:53 pm

Absolutely Addict,

The Diary gives a full insight into daily life and how language has gradually changed. While reading about the journeys I kept thinking he hasn't mentioned anything about his horse yet then realised it was shank's pony!
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RE: 1841

Postby Woodlander » Sun Sep 23, 2007 7:50 pm

How wonderful to have such a diary. I too don't reakky imagine life as it was then - although I try! Must be great to have a true record.
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RE: 1841

Postby FamilyHistoryAddict » Sun Sep 23, 2007 8:23 pm

The census year feature which will be in each edition of the new magazine should enable us to have a better understanding of these different times. I'm looking forward to seeing the magazine and reading about 1841.
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RE: 1841

Postby Guy » Tue Sep 25, 2007 1:33 am

You don't mention what your ancestor did for a living but in the mid 1900s Thornham was used as a port to export corn and import coal.
Perhaps your ancestor to a load of corn down the coast by boat or collected some coal for Wells next to the Sea.
The coastal villages there were in an area of salt marshes and were therefore set further back from the sea than perhaps expected and served by small inlets.
Cheers
Guy
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RE: 1841

Postby FamilyHistoryAddict » Tue Sep 25, 2007 2:06 am

Hi Guy,

Yes, my relative could very well have been working in the way you describe. He was always listed as a Labourer. I found this information on him from Walsingham Union Poor Law Records just before 1841; so he would have been extremely glad to get work - even travel to get it too I expect!

[b]Walsingham Union Poor Law Records:[/b]
27 May 1836
WELLS NEXT the SEA, Norfolk
James Kemp aged 48, wife, aged 47 and 5 children. To be allowed 1½ stone of flour this week.

Thanks again for your interest which is most appreciated and I'm pleased you know so much about Thornham, Wells and Norfolk. [:)] Two of his sons eventually went into the Merchant Navy, so the boats you talk about sounds spot on!
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RE: 1841

Postby sparrow hawk » Tue Oct 02, 2007 5:46 am

Well my mams side of the family were coal miners/owners and of course farmers in Weardale and Teesdale.
So there must of lived a rough existence out on the fells.
sparrow hawk
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RE: 1841

Postby vintagefinelady » Wed Oct 03, 2007 5:36 pm

[size=3][font="times new roman"]The 1841 census shows ancestors of mine living at Hollow Bottom, Bromley,Kent. He was a labourer, aged 45, his wife was 35 and they had 9 children. [/font][/size]
[size=3][font="times new roman"] [/font][/size]
[size=3][font="times new roman"]Hollow Bottom is shown on an ordnance survey map of the time as a small cluster of houses some miles from the centre of Bromley so the family were being raised in a rural area. In his book, ‘[i]Not A Mile From Milk Street’[/i], Andrew J. Martin tells us that in 1841 in Hollow Bottom there were ‘180 men, women and children, including about 30 labourers (general, builders and agricultural) and others listed as carpenters, gardeners, grooms, blacksmiths, sailors, menservants, an army private, a meal man and a grocer (the publican)’ [/font][/size]
[size=3][font="times new roman"] [/font][/size]
[size=3][font="times new roman"]Bromley itself was still a market town at this time, with a population of 4,325 people. Around half of the land in the parish was being farmed. There were also several large estates, home to successful merchants who had in the past made their home half a days ride from London.[/font][/size]
[size=3][font="times new roman"][/font][/size]
[size=3][font="times new roman"][/font][/size]
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