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Using DNA results

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Using DNA results

Postby oldenstar » Mon Sep 30, 2019 4:04 pm

My BIG brickwall is that my Paternal Grandfather was born in Paddington Workhouse, illegitimately, in 1878. The only name on the birth certificate is that of his mother, and hence my family name, BISHOPP, stems from the mother.
I have gone back a long way with the BISHOPP family in Kent which is good.

However is there any way that I might be able to learn anything about my Great Grandfather using the DNA results?

Thanks

Paul
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Re: Using DNA results

Postby JaneyH » Mon Sep 30, 2019 4:41 pm

DNA testing is certainly an option for you. Your success will depend on whether the person concerned had other children (or his relatives did) and their descendants have also taken a DNA test. This article explains how DNA testing can help in your circumstances: https://dna-explained.com/2019/06/27/id ... -matching/

This one is a more general introduction: https://dna-explained.com/2019/08/06/fi ... ogy-water/


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Re: Using DNA results

Postby pollymac » Mon Sep 30, 2019 4:49 pm

My major brick wall has many similarities to yours, Paul.
My great grandfather was born in Paddington workhouse illegitimately in 1865. He was also given his mother’s surname which was Timms.
I am in the process of trying to find the father’s surname using DNA. My brother and I have both taken Ancestry DNA tests. My brother has also taken a YDNA test with Family Tree DNA in the attempt to find out our paternal line surname. He is a direct line male descendant. This came back with quite a few matches having the same surname which I am now investigating.
I am also reading and learning as much as I can about DNA. It is quite a steep learning curve!
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Re: Using DNA results

Postby oldenstar » Mon Sep 30, 2019 6:50 pm

Many thanks JaneyH and pollymac

All noted and have 'pocketed' those pages JaneyH.

How very similar pollymac, so we both have the 'wrong' surnames it seems.
With great respect to all Smiths, I hope mine doesn't turn out to be Smith!

It seems my DNA studies start here. Actually I have had it done 3 times, the last one being free with FMP. Mostly 3rd, 4th, 5th cousins

Thanks again

Paul
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Re: Using DNA results

Postby JaneyH » Mon Sep 30, 2019 8:24 pm

Good luck!

For the record, I’m on the hunt for an ancestor’s unnamed father too. My great-grandfather’s birth certificate has no father’s name shown. His mother was married, although her husband seems to have been long gone. GGF was born in Huddersfield in Yorkshire in 1869.

Thus far I have a group of DNA matches in the USA, who share a common ancestor who emigrated from the UK to the USA in 1869. He was born and lived in ... Huddersfield.

It’s a tantalising connection, but it’s far from proven so far.


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Re: Using DNA results

Postby MortimerCat » Tue Oct 01, 2019 8:08 am

My experience was from another direction but it proves DNA can be invaluable in genealogy. My Great-Grandfather was born in Marylebone workhouse, no father listed. A few years later he appears on a census within a family group. For years, I carried on researching the name, but always had this niggling doubt in the back of my mind "Was this the real father or am I researching some unrelated person?".

Just so happened, during my research, I came across someone doing a one-name study on the surname, who would have been a third cousin.

Years later, when I finally took the DNA test, the other researcher appeared on my list of matches, finally proving that the man I had researched was my direct ancestor.
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Re: Using DNA results

Postby HardWork » Tue Oct 01, 2019 9:33 am

Well my problem was slightly different but similar. I had reason to doubt the man on my father's birth certificate was his biological father. I took a Y DNA test with FTDNA in 2014 and immediately had a match with a fellow descended from a family in a village about ten miles away from where my grandmother lived. About 10 tests of others with ancestors in the same county in the intervening years not only confirmed a surname and proved all testers had a distant ancestor in common, but due to luck, one had a verifiable tree back to late 1500s which suggested the ancestor in common died c1450. Then, only in May of this year, I took an Ancestry autosomal test and suddenly found my family as I had matches to five people from one family. My only job now is to be sure which of five brothers was potentially my grandfather.

May I suggest it may we worthwhile, if you have found a not-too-common surname that links you, that you start a one name study of the surname (if one does not already exist) as this will highlight those lines likely and not so likely to feature your ancestor. For that, you may well need a good family history program to keep track of them.

Good luck in your quest!
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Re: Using DNA results

Postby Mcguffey » Tue Oct 01, 2019 11:32 am

Can you suggest a good family history program for a situation like this? Mine is very similar.
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Re: Using DNA results

Postby oldenstar » Wed Oct 02, 2019 8:33 am

Not sure that any Family History programme is any better or worse for this situation.

However I find that I cannot fault Legacy, which is a pain because I am a Mac user and it doesn’t support Mac.

I have tried all the others and none of them can touch the Family view of Legacy, so I now have to have a small Windows laptop for this.

Yes I have tried Windows within Parallels but I find it works so slowly.

So my recommendation generally is the Legacy programme

Paul
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Re: Using DNA results

Postby MysticDave » Fri Oct 11, 2019 2:26 am

What does everyone think of Ancestry as I think it might be my next port of call?

I had my DNA tested through BritainsDNA, the company, which did the programmes with Eddie izzard. The results were on a dot map, essentially in the shape of Europe. The main line came across the Mediterranean to northern Spain, then France and into the UK, so basically the Celtic route. There is a little Norwegian Viking (g-g-granny from Dublin) and then a big Jewish footprint - mostly eastern European Ashkenazi, but some Sephardic, which appeared to mix with some Ashkenazi in Holland, and a small line running from Holland through the Saarland down towards Austria and Hungary. There is a decent size lump of French, which is my mother's maternal line.

My mother was illegitimate and never said who her father was, but this must be where the Jewish DNA comes from. We have some Jewish characteristics - I have a bump at the top of my nose! However, the name I was given by a cousin of my mother goes back into the Nottinghamshire/Lincs border area around Newark and down towards Grantham. They seem to be agricultural workers and there are no synagogues round there.

I have my Y tested some years ago with Oxford DNA and it goes back to the early settlers of the UK, probably around Cannock Chase, which would fit with the Celtic footprint.

So, I loaded my DNA on to MyHeritage - it gave me 4% Scandi, 67% West European and 29% English (meaning a ragbag of every invading population!). There is a faint trace of Ashkenazi and no Sephardic. However, outside of UK, the old empire and USA, the next commonest link is Holland (or Dutch names in South Africa and USA), then Germany. There are a few links in Austria, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovenia, which backs the Jewish line supposed to go that way.

I also put my DNA on Family Tree - that came up with no Scandi, 55% West European, 3% SE Europe (which could be very original Jewish) and 42% English, which may be that big Celtic line really.

There are some strange relationships kicking around on MyHeritage. I have some small, single segments of DNA in common with Norwegians, but the split must have been more than a thousand years ago, although I suspect the blue-gray eyes my sister got from my father originate there! There is also a chap in Wales, who is supposed to be my 2nd cousin once removed (probably me being second cousin of his parents as I am older), but all his grandparents are Welsh, albeit his surname is the same as the mother of my supposed maternal grandfather. So, I am wondering if some of these DNA relationship signals are actually stronger than the relationship actually is - as some of my Norwegians must be about 40th cousins.

is Ancestry the next stop?
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