Moderator Control Panel ]

Feby Milner

A problem shared is a problem halved. Post your brick walls here and see whether you can offer advice to others

Re: Feby Milner

Postby sdup26 » Thu Jan 31, 2019 11:19 am

Cleveland Family History Society (https://clevelandfhs.org.uk) has family records covering North Yorkshire and Durham, and a lot of general information on the history of the areas.
sdup26
 
Posts: 1483
Joined: Tue Apr 19, 2011 4:34 pm

Re: Feby Milner

Postby Lucretia66 » Fri Feb 01, 2019 3:47 pm

Very you very much.
I'm not very good with abbreviations. There are too many to remember these days and not just with genealogy.
Lucretia66
 
Posts: 53
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2017 4:46 pm

Re: Feby Milner

Postby Lucretia66 » Fri Feb 15, 2019 1:43 pm

Little update.
I have recently discovered that the village of Muker has a dwindling population over time, so, it is much smaller today than it once was. The decline of the mills seems to be the reason for it with many families emigrating to America and Canada to find work.
I've also found out the Milners are described as one large interrelated clan. So it would seem as if I haven't searched enough for links between the two Milner families as it looks as if they are one family branch instead of two.
Oh well, we all make mistakes as they say, so back to the start with this one. Ancestry.com may be helpful here.
Lucretia66
 
Posts: 53
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2017 4:46 pm

Re: Feby Milner

Postby Lucretia66 » Sat Feb 16, 2019 8:40 am

The below is some information that I found which may help with others looking for North Yorkshire ancestry. It includes a lot of places that my ancestors lived in too. Very interesting, but disturbing in places too towards the end.

The flight from the Dales in the 19th century halved the population and family names like Calvert, Kearton and Metcalfe went around the globe. Roger Ratcliffe reports The scene is an overgrown churchyard in the small village of Hauxwell in Wensleydale on a hot blue Indian summer's day. A man with a red baseball cap is trampling down the long grass and thick nettles to peer at the almost illegible inscriptions on leaning gravestones. His intentness indicates more than idle curiosity. His name is Gerard Hunt and he is on a fortnight's visit to the Dales from his home near Toronto in Canada. If you were to ask Gerard, "Who do you think you are?" the reply would be to indicate the memorials to the generations who lie buried in this ground and in other similar Dales churchyards. "My mother's side of the family – the Plewes – emigrated from this very village in 1850," says Gerard. "My father's side are the Hunts from Muker in Swaledale, and I've found out that I'm also descended from the Aldersons, another great Dales name. Last night, over dinner in Leyburn, I discovered a distant cousin. It seems that pretty much every Dales family is inter-related. It's not so much a family tree as a web." That web eventually spread to all corners of the earth. And the closeness of the Dales ties which often bound these people is shown by the fact that a visit to a particular graveyard in the American West will reveal the same names and families chiselled on the gravestones as on those in Swaledale.These doughty emigrants had qualities which for one reason or another were stifled or thwarted at home. Once they had established themselves in foreign fields with broader horizons, they came into their own. Gerard's ancestors built corn mills, textile mills and sawmills in Canada. Others set up coal mines in New Zealand, tended herds of sheep in Australia, or joined those great trailblazing wagon trains across America to begin cattle ranching and earn a better living off the land.Glenys Marriott, who has been studying this great movement of Dales people, says that about 12,000 people like Gerard's ancestors left Arkengarthdale, Swaledale and Wensleydale during the 19th century. In 1821, some 15,000 people were recorded as living in the northern Dales. But 90 years later emigration and departures for destinations closer to home such as Lancashire and the West Riding cut that figure by half.

Read more at: https://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/an ... -1-3022192

It was an exodus of potential and vigour which could be ill-afforded. Most of those departing for good were in their teens and twenties and they left behind an ageing population. What became of the pioneers is a story that's long been hidden away in archives of private family letters. But now the fascinating accounts of these trail-blazers has been researched by the Upper Dales Family History Group. They have brought it all together in a book which follows in detail the stories of over 100 Dales families who uprooted themselves from the familiar places to test themselves in uncharted and challenging territory. Glenys Marriott, the chair of the history group, says: "People did some amazing things. From the letters we learn, for example, that these wagon trains trundling westwards across America were so long that children – they were usually forced to walk because possessions took up the space on wagon – found themselves unable to keep up. They ended up in the wagon train following behind, and sometimes parents wouldn't see their children again for a month."Some things that came out in the letters were family secrets, and have been kept out of the book. "We have to be very careful about confidentiality where people who are still living are concerned," Glenys insists. "But where those concerned are long dead the stories can at last be told."One such tale is that of the Longstroth family, who lived at Arncliffe in Littondale and left Liverpool for America in 1842. Stephen Longstroth became a Mormon, and over the next dozen years he wrote letters to his family back in the Dales describing his journey after landing in New Orleans. In 1848, for example, he told of fighting a mob who were trying to drive Mormons from the city. Soon afterwards he became part of the legendary Brigham Young's pioneering group who trekked to Salt Lake City and set up their Mormon Temple.

But his letters home omitted a very important fact. He had married his three daughters off to the same man, one Willard Richards, in a single wedding. Polygamy, at that time, was part of the Mormon faith, but news of the marriages would have been deeply upsetting to his Dales relatives. Another fascinating story told in the book is that of the Keartons of Swaledale, who emigrated to the Caribbean and purchased a half-share in a sugar and coffee plantation on the island of St Vincent. Two centuries later the site of the plantation still carries the famous Swaledale name, being known as Kearton's Bay. Less recalled these days, however, is their use of slaves on the plantation.
Lucretia66
 
Posts: 53
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2017 4:46 pm

Previous

Return to General research queries


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 3 guests