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Old terminology

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Old terminology

Postby GREGTOM7 » Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:04 pm

Hi, in some of the older censuses I have encountered terms which I have been unable to identify elsewhere so would be glad of any assistance:

"Hand-daughter"-this was used in a census to describe the relationship of the head of household to certain female members (who do not bear his surname)-does it indicate a familial connection or is it more a term to describe, say, a working role within it, e.g.as a servant?

"Licker" or "Lickerer"-appears under occupation and is sometimes combined with another term such as "tobacco" or ""side manufacturer",e.g.1911 census Georgina Bond b.1868 living in Bristol is described as a "tobacco lickerer" or, same census, Charlie Ashworth b.1859 living in Prestwich, Lancs. is described as a "Licker side manufacturer". My initial impression was that it was an old misspelling of "liquor" but this does not fit with non-alcoholic uses of it.
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Re: Old terminology

Postby Guy » Sun Nov 04, 2018 9:21 am

GREGTOM7 wrote:Hi, in some of the older censuses I have encountered terms which I have been unable to identify elsewhere so would be glad of any assistance:

"Hand-daughter"-this was used in a census to describe the relationship of the head of household to certain female members (who do not bear his surname)-does it indicate a familial connection or is it more a term to describe, say, a working role within it, e.g.as a servant?

"Licker" or "Lickerer"-appears under occupation and is sometimes combined with another term such as "tobacco" or ""side manufacturer",e.g.1911 census Georgina Bond b.1868 living in Bristol is described as a "tobacco lickerer" or, same census, Charlie Ashworth b.1859 living in Prestwich, Lancs. is described as a "Licker side manufacturer". My initial impression was that it was an old misspelling of "liquor" but this does not fit with non-alcoholic uses of it.


Good guess modern spelling would be tobacco liquorer as you though, he/she would in fact spray the tobacco with water.
The Dictionary of Occupational Terms states -
“(i) takes the leaves from the bales on which they are imported ; spreads them out ; sprays them with water from a hand syringe, or places them in liquoring machine, turns on spray, and removes them when the liquoring process is complete; stands them in trays to become supple enough for handling...”

Cheers
Guy

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Re: Old terminology

Postby MaureenE » Sun Nov 04, 2018 8:39 pm

GREGTOM7 wrote:Hi, in some of the older censuses I have encountered terms which I have been unable to identify elsewhere so would be glad of any assistance:

"Hand-daughter"-this was used in a census to describe the relationship of the head of household to certain female members (who do not bear his surname)-does it indicate a familial connection or is it more a term to describe, say, a working role within it, e.g.as a servant?


A Hand maiden is defined as a female servant in this link
http://www.familytreeassociation.org/g-i.html

Cheers
Maureen
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