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Kings Silver Books

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Kings Silver Books

Postby KayFarndon » Thu Mar 01, 2018 9:56 am

I have a photo copy of something which no-one can shed light on, It was among family papers held by solicitors in their archives and reads:

Among the records deposited in the Public Record Office London, to wit, Kings Silver Books Trinity, 2 Geo: 4 page 83, it is thus contained.

It goes on to list names of people, signed I by a Constable [presume police man].

It then continues:

I hereby certify the above to be a true and authentic copy of the original record in the custody of the Master of the Rolls, preserved in the Public Records Office.

It is dated 1859 and signed by the assistant keeper of the public records.

Can anyone give any clue to what this might pertain too, or what Kings Silver Book is before I investigate further please? Putting it into Google only brings up modern literature, which it isn't.
KayFarndon
 
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Re: Kings Silver Books

Postby woodchal » Thu Mar 01, 2018 10:14 am

I can only copy what is said on The National Archives index

Reference: CP 34
Title: Court of Common Pleas: King's Silver Books, Series I
Description:
Books compiled by the Clerk of the King's Silver to record the amount, known as the king's silver or post-fine, paid by the plaintiff in a collusive suit to levy a final concord, for the licence to agree and terminate the suit in the Court of Common Pleas. The series probably started either in the reign of Henry VIII or Edward VI, from which the earliest surviving examples, badly damaged, come. There are many minor gaps, and two long ones from 1657 to 1669, and from 1676 to 1702, many of which must be accounted for by the damaged books. The amount of detail given in the individual entries varies somewhat over the period. The same information was entered in special sections of the plea rolls until 1583, and thereafter in the recovery rolls. The entries in the king's silver books may simply be drafts for those entered on the plea or recovery roll.

and

The office of Clerk of the King's Silver existed by 1519 at latest. Until the early eighteenth century each entry, or at least each page, was noted as having been examined, presumably by the clerk of the king's silver himself. In the early eighteenth century the surname of the chief prothonotary was sometimes given at the head of the page. Feet of fines were abolished in 1833, and the office of clerk of the king's silver itself was abolished in 1835, by 5 & 6 William IV, c 82.

Not sure I am much the wiser.
woodchal
 
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Re: Kings Silver Books

Postby ermin79 » Thu Mar 01, 2018 10:15 am

Looks to be possibly related to conveyancing (which is probably why its in solicitors papers) and cases heard at the court of common pleas. This is a link to the search results from the Discovery catalogue of the UK National Archives:

http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.u ... ilver+book


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Re: Kings Silver Books

Postby woodchal » Thu Mar 01, 2018 10:36 am

woodchal
 
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Re: Kings Silver Books

Postby KayFarndon » Thu Mar 01, 2018 11:42 am

Thank you all.
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