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Alexander Henderson & Jean Noble

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Alexander Henderson & Jean Noble

Postby c.thorman » Fri Feb 16, 2018 3:38 pm

Compeared, Alexander Henderson Weaver in Old Aberdeen Scotland. Marriage with Jean Noble in said town, they did not consign pledges but Francis Cunnig (I think last word) merchant in Old Aberdeen & George Henderson Weaver there having become cautioners by granting a conjunel bill for them. they were orderly proclaimed there several Lords Prayers and married here june 28th 1744 by Mr James Hilchel Minster of the gospel old Aberdeen

any help on what some of it means would be great
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Re: Alexander Henderson & Jean Noble

Postby JMcK » Sat Feb 17, 2018 6:40 pm

Compeared means “appeared before the judge/court”
A cautioner is a bondsman who gives surety/money as a bond

Conjunal. - I bet that’s conjugal.


Alexander appeared before the court, the two other guys said he was a good bloke and put up money as surety for that fact. The marriage took place
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Re: Alexander Henderson & Jean Noble

Postby JMcK » Sat Feb 17, 2018 6:54 pm

Compeared means “appeared before the judge/court”
A cautioner is a bondsman who gives surety/money as a bond

Conjunal. - I bet that’s conjugal.


Alexander appeared before the court, the two other guys said he was a good bloke and put up money as surety for that fact. The marriage took place

You don’t give a date but I found this at https://academic.oup.com/jsh/article/47/2/507/1325355. which seems to fit the circumstances - excerpt here;

“With the introduction of civil registration in 1854 all regular marriages were registered and under Lord Brougham's Act of 1856, a semi-formalized system of registering irregular marriages was introduced that enabled couples to register their marriages after conviction or payment of a fine before a justice of the peace or a magistrate. As Clive has observed, the “conviction” was purely fictitious since it was not illegal to contract an irregular marriage. The system was introduced merely as a device to record irregular marriages.35 This system remained until the Marriage Act (Scotland) 1916 which abolished any criminal proceedings and introduced provision for registration on a sheriff's warrant within three months of the marriage. Marriages arranged in this way were commonly referred to as “marriages before the Sheriff.” Therefore from 1856 there is a record of registered irregular marriage until it was abolished in 1939.
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Re: Alexander Henderson & Jean Noble

Postby c.thorman » Sat Feb 17, 2018 11:13 pm

Thanks for that but why would they pay money to say he was a good person,had he done something wrong
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Re: Alexander Henderson & Jean Noble

Postby AdrianB38 » Sun Feb 18, 2018 8:19 am

I'm not familiar with the Scots system but if it's anything like the English then, judging by the terms used, this sounds like the bond that is put up when granting a marriage licence. Essentially the guy who is to be married swears that there is no reason why he shouldn't - eg, he's not already married. To encourage him to tell the truth, he and someone else (with money) put up a bond. Under all normal circumstances, they don't actually hand over any cash - only if it turns out that he was lying about being able to marry - because he was already married (say) - will they have to stump up the cash.

This isn't quite the same, I'm sure, but the basic idea holds - the bond is an encouragement to tell the truth about something. It's not normally paid and he's not broken any law.

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Re: Alexander Henderson & Jean Noble

Postby c.thorman » Sun Feb 18, 2018 9:56 am

Thanks
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