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lost in 1851 and 1861

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lost in 1851 and 1861

Postby nuttree » Sun Jan 28, 2018 12:05 pm

HELP please can anyone find William Flavell on the 1851 or 1861 census.

WILLIAM appears on the 1871 Census RG10/3026 fo149 p31 born 1846 SEDGLEY
GRO index has a birth 1846 M Quarter in DUDLEY mother FLAVILL

There are several Williams in the area at the same time but this William is either the son of Benjamin and Sarah FLAVELL as on the 1871 census or the orphan son of Edmond and Mary FLAVELL.
Benjamin and Edmond were sons of James and Maria FLAVELL their wives were sisters daughters of George and Fanny FLAVELL . Edmond died in 1849 and Mary died in 1850 their baby son was baptised correctly son of Edmond and Mary after his parents' deaths. In 1851 the baby is listed as son of Benjamin He is buried a year later in the same place as his mother.
So where was William in 1851 and 1861? and whose son was he?
nuttree
 
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Re: lost in 1851 and 1861

Postby nuttree » Sun Jan 28, 2018 6:37 pm

Just to add to the confusion it seems that the William registered in Q1 1846 was infact the son of James FLAVELL and his wife Eiza Flavell (nee Flavell) He was baptised and buried with in 6 days, When this couple married they had the same witnesses as Benjamin and Sarah and an E liza(this one??) witnessed the marriage of Edmund and Mary
So who was the 25 year old William "son " of Benjamine in 1871?
nuttree
 
Posts: 96
Joined: Mon Jun 08, 2015 9:17 pm

Re: lost in 1851 and 1861

Postby nuttree » Mon Feb 05, 2018 5:20 pm

I wonder Was William FLAVELL in Stourbridge work house when his parents died and was he apprenticed to a “Butty miner” Peter Higginbotham mentions some boys were apprenticed in this way until their 21st birthday that would mean William being released from apprentiship in 1868 as a trained miner he suddenly appeared with Benjamin in 1871 as a miner aged 25.
This looks like a possibility to me but still doesn't exp;lain his absence fron the 1851 and 1861 censuses unless he did not "sleep in any house" on the night of the census was he on nights or worse did he sleep at the mine. Your thoughts on this sugestion please.

“In 1842, the Poor Law Commissioners investigating the employment and conditions of children in mines and manufactories, discovered that workhouse boys, some as young as eight, were being sent on "apprenticeships" of up to twelve years working in coal mines....The Stourbridge union clerk, Henry Duignan, also assured the Commissioners that any boys so apprenticed were believed to be properly treated by their masters. ” http://www.workhouses.org.uk/Stourbridge/

http://www.staffspasttrack.org.uk/exhib ... system.htm
Organisation / Butty system
During the early part of the nineteenth century, the coal miners were not directly employed by the owners but by a contractor, called a "Butty". He engaged with the mine owner to deliver coal or ironstone at so much per ton. He employed the labourers required using his own horses and tools. After the 1872 Coal Mines Act the ‘Butty’ system disappeared.
nuttree
 
Posts: 96
Joined: Mon Jun 08, 2015 9:17 pm


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