Moderator Control Panel ]

How long was allowed (back in 1865) to register a birth?

A problem shared is a problem halved. Post your brick walls here and see whether you can offer advice to others

Re: How long was allowed (back in 1865) to register a birth?

Postby peter kent » Mon Sep 11, 2017 7:25 am

The parents' actions appear to be written as "may" but they have to pay this 7/6 fee if they don't...


The fine was for refusing to provide information to the registrar if asked. If he didn't ask, there was no fine.
peter kent
 
Posts: 482
Joined: Fri Jul 11, 2014 10:30 am
Location: Kent, UK

Re: How long was allowed (back in 1865) to register a birth?

Postby ianbee » Mon Sep 11, 2017 8:20 am

peter kent wrote:The fine was for refusing to provide information to the registrar if asked. If he didn't ask, there was no fine.

" shall, within Forty-two Days next after the Day of every such Birth, give Information, upon being requested so to do, to the said Registrar"

I'm not sure exactly what the fine was for failing to do that, or even if there was a fixed sum.

For registering the birth after 42 days
"after the Expiration of Forty-two Days following the Day of the Birth of any Child it shall not be lawful for any Registrar to register such Birth, save as herein-after is next mentioned; provided that, in case the Birth of any Child shall not have been registered according to the Provisions herein-before contained, it shall be lawful for any person present at the Birth of such Child, or for the Father or Guardian thereof, at any Time within Six Calendar Months next after the Birth, to make a solemn Declaration of the Particulars required to be known touching the Birth of such Child, according to the best of his or her Knowledge and Belief, and it thereupon be lawful for the said Registrar then and there, in the Presence of the Superintendent Registrar, to register the Birth of the said Child according to the Information of the Person making the said Declaration......
ianbee
 
Posts: 2289
Joined: Wed Jul 28, 2010 4:51 pm

Re: How long was allowed (back in 1865) to register a birth?

Postby ianbee » Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:15 pm

pforkes wrote:How long was given to register a birth, back in 1865, and what were the punishments for failing to do this in time?

Here are some thoughts from The Cardiff and Merthyr Guardian, 30 November 1866.
Attachments
Cardiff 1866.JPG
Cardiff 1866.JPG (127.6 KiB) Viewed 722 times
Cardiff + Merthyr 1866.JPG
Cardiff + Merthyr 1866.JPG (132.35 KiB) Viewed 722 times
ianbee
 
Posts: 2289
Joined: Wed Jul 28, 2010 4:51 pm

Re: How long was allowed (back in 1865) to register a birth?

Postby ianbee » Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:59 pm

I've given up on this post, and deleted it!
Ian
Last edited by ianbee on Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:04 pm, edited 2 times in total.
ianbee
 
Posts: 2289
Joined: Wed Jul 28, 2010 4:51 pm

Re: How long was allowed (back in 1865) to register a birth?

Postby AdrianB38 » Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:59 pm

Interesting! I think that there's still an element of "Registrars are interfering busybodies" there...

That's viewing the 7/6 as a fee and not as a penalty. As it says, the parents aren't obliged to do anything, so can hardly be penalised for a late registration. Just made to pay a fee instead....

Sent from my MotoG3 using WDYTYA Forum mobile app
Adrian
AdrianB38
 
Posts: 2536
Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 4:07 pm

Re: How long was allowed (back in 1865) to register a birth?

Postby Guy » Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:14 pm

Parents had 42 days to register the birth of their child without penalty.
After 42 days they would have to pay addition fees.

The 1836 Act puts it this way
https://tinyurl.com/yauv9dd5

“XIX. And be it enacted, That the Father or Mother of any Child born, or the Occupier of every House or Tenement in England in which any Birth or Death shall happen, after the said First day of March, may, within Forty-two Days next after the Day of such Birth or within Five Days after the Day of such Death respectively, give Notice of such Birth or Death to the Registrar of the District ; and in case any new-born Child or any dead Body shall be found exposed, the Overseers of the Poor in the Case of the new-born Child, and the Coroner in the case of the dead Body, shall forthwith give Notice and Information thereof, and of the Place where such Child or dead Body was found, to the Registrar ; and for the Purpose of this Act the Master or Keeper of every Gaol, Prison, or House of Correction, or Workhouse, Hospital, or Lunatic Asylum, or public or charitable Institution, shall be deemed the Occupier thereof.

XXII. And be it enacted, That after the Expiration of Forty-two Days following the Day of the Birth of any Child it shall not be lawful for any Registrar to register such Birth, save as herein-after is next mentioned ; provided that, in case the Birth of any Child shall not have been registered according to the Provisions herein-before contained, it shall be lawful for any person present at the Birth of such Child, or for the Father or Guardian thereof, at any Time within Six Calendar Months next after the Birth, to make a solemn Declaration of the Particulars required to be known touching the Birth of such Child, according to the best of his or her Knowledge and Belief, and it thereupon be lawful for the said Registrar then and there, in the Presence of the Superintendent Registrar, to register the Birth of the said Child according to the Information of the Person making the said Declaration ; and in every such Case the Superintendent Registrar before whom the said Declaration is made shall sign the Entry of Birth as well as the registrar, and for every such Registry as last aforesaid the Superintendent Registrar shall be entitled to have a Fee of Two Shillings and Sixpence from the Person requiring the same to be registered ; and the Registrar, over and above the Fee herein-after enacted in respect of every birth registered by him, shall be entitled, unless the Delay shall have been occasioned by his Default, to have a Fee of Five Shillings from the person requiring the same to be registered ; and no Register of Births shall be given in Evidence to prove the Birth of any Child wherein it shall appear that Forty-two Days have intervened between the Day of the Birth and the Day of the Registration of the Birth of such Child, unless the Entry shall be signed by the Superintendent Registrar ; and every person who shall knowingly register or cause to be registered the Birth of any Child, otherwise than herein-before is last mentioned, after the Expiration of Forty-two Days following the Day of Birth of such Child, shall forfeit and pay for every such Offence a Sum not exceeding Fifty Pounds.

XXIII. And be it enacted, That after the Expiration of Six Calendar Months following the Birth of any Child it shall not be lawful for any Registrar to register the Birth of such Child, and no Register of Births, except in the Case of Children born at Sea, shall be given in Evidence to prove the Birth of any Child wherein it shall appear that Six Calendar Months have intervened between the Day of the Birth and the Day of the Registration of the Birth of such Child ; and every Person who shall knowingly register or cause to be registered the Birth of any Child after the Expiration of Six Calendar Months following the Day of the Birth of such Child shall forfeit and pay for every such Offence a Sum not exceeding Fifty Pounds.”

As may be seen there, despite what many who should know better state, was always a penalty for late registration, it just was not called a fine or penalty.
Cheers
Guy

PS On reading the thread I see this has been mentioned earlier, teach me to read the full thread rather than just the title ;)
As we have gained from the past, we owe the future a debt, which we pay by sharing today.
Guy
 
Posts: 372
Joined: Thu Jul 09, 2009 3:56 pm

Previous

Return to General research queries


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests