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Weavers and Miners

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Weavers and Miners

Postby fridayschild » Thu May 29, 2008 3:00 am

Most of my Ancestors lived in East Lancashire and they were Cotton Weavers and Coal Miners
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RE: Weavers and Miners

Postby RichardCrane » Sun Jun 01, 2008 4:36 am

My ancestors on my father's side of my family (the Cranes) lived in Lancashire as far back as the 17th century according to our family tree. Also, they were cotton weavers too. My earliest recorded ancestor, Henry Crane lived in Bispham, just north of Blackpool, likewise did the next two genrations of Crane until Richard Crane (born 1769) and his family moved to Garstang. Most likely, they went by sea from Blackpool to Preston, and then up the canals to Garstang. Also, the move must've being as a result into mechanisation of the cotton industry and theintroduction of the factory system. Then Richard Crane the 2nd (born 1815) moved to Preston, where the next three generations of Cranes worked in the cotton mills, under the name of Horrocks (which was founded by Samuel and John Horrocks, whom actress Jane Horrocks is related to) Then, Richard Crane the 3rd's youngest son of seven children, Sydney Ronald Crane (my grandfather) was the only Crane to move down south to Hampshire.

The cotton industry really moved many generations of Cranes from twon to town.

Richard Crane
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RE: Weavers and Miners

Postby RichardCrane » Fri Jul 11, 2008 6:46 pm

As far as I'm aware I don't have mining ancestors, but I have being very interested in the mining industry. Back in autumn 2007, BBC Wales made a television series called Coal House, which was about three modern day families living together as a 1927-style mining community in coal miners' cottages. They had to live and work in the style of the 1920s, with the men working underground in the drift mines for many hours a day. The children had to go to school with all of them in the same class. The women had to work from dawn to dusk doing the the domestic house chores. All the wages the miners made went towards paying for the food
- and the rent!

As well as WDYTYA, living history programmes like Coal House give us an insight into the world our ancestors lived! Buy Coal House on DVD! I have!

Richard Crane
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RE: Weavers and Miners

Postby Annie08 » Sat Jul 12, 2008 2:16 am

Hi
My ancestors were miners in the Rhondda, South Wales between the 1870s and 1950s so I was really keen to see the Mining Series, as the period in question fitted with my family, however events dictated and I only saw one episode. Thanks for the tip, I didn't realise it was available on DVD - I shall look for it tomorrow.

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RE: Weavers and Miners

Postby Annie08 » Wed Jul 23, 2008 4:56 am

I managed to get hold of Coal House on DVD. I didn't realise there were 10 episodes - I'd certainly missed something! I've now watched it and thoroughly enjoyed it.

Last year I had the opportunity to visit the Big Pit at Blaneavon and did the tour, I really enjoyed it. On the tour I did there was a little boy, about 6, and he opened/closed the vent doors for us just as his contemporaries would have done.

Coupled together these have given me an idea of what life must have been like for my Grandfather, etc. in the mining industry.

I also had ancestors who worked in the 1820s/1840s at Llanelly Copperworks - now what about 'Copper House' - BBC are you reading this?

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RE: Weavers and Miners

Postby RichardCrane » Mon Aug 11, 2008 6:56 pm

Following on from Coal House, BBC should do a living history TV series called Cotton House, so that families in this modern world can live the lives of our ancestors involved in the cotton industry in Lancashire during the 19th or the 20th century.

BBC, what do you think?

Richard Crane.
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RE: Weavers and Miners

Postby margaretabram » Mon Aug 11, 2008 10:33 pm

I'll second that, Richard. What a brilliant idea. It would have educational uses too. So many of us have this industry in our family histories and if it could bring the reality alive to a wider audience it would be great - so come on BBC!
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RE: Weavers and Miners

Postby Lou79 » Tue Aug 12, 2008 10:26 pm

I came across the Coal House showing on a Sunday 7pm on BBC3. Think its up to eposide 7 now. Havent managed to watch them all but they really give an insite to how my mining ancestors lived. Well worth watching.
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RE: Weavers and Miners

Postby Lou79 » Tue Aug 19, 2008 12:16 am

Sorry it was BBC4 - managed to catch it last night.
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RE: Weavers and Miners

Postby RichardCrane » Sun Sep 21, 2008 2:26 am

Attention, anyone interested in the mining industry!

Yesterday, I got the new issue of WDYTYA magazine in the post (featuring Jodie Kidd on the front cover) and, amongst the ads for television shows, it is confirmed that there is a follow-up to the living history TV series, Coal House; this time, however, it is called Coal House at War.

This time, three families will live in South Wales as a mining community during the Second World War. From 1927 to World War 2! What a move for a sequel!

Richard Crane
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