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1939 census

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1939 census

Postby Ashbee » Wed May 24, 2017 2:14 pm

Just a quick question: am I right in thinking the 1939 census doesn't show place of birth or occupation but does show address and date of birth? I'm wondering if I've not accessed the file on FindmyPast properly...
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Re: 1939 census

Postby sdup26 » Wed May 24, 2017 3:26 pm

If you click on 'advanced search' you can enter birthday, birth year, and occupation, but although the person's 1939 address comes up on the entry, original birthplace isn't asked for.
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Re: 1939 census

Postby Ashbee » Wed May 24, 2017 4:09 pm

Great, thanks...that confirms that I have all that is available.

Cheers!
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1939 census

Postby brunes08 » Wed May 24, 2017 4:48 pm

Just as a point of interest, the 1939 Register was not a census. It was a gathering of basic information to record individuals entitled to be in the country at the outbreak of the Second World War. Overseas nationals would be listed on a traditional census but not on the Register. Some of them had the option of returning to their native land or being interned. Serving members of the armed forces are not on the Register either as they are listed in forces records. This list was eventually used as the basis for the NHS. The National Archives has useful information on the Register.
Occupations are entered on the Register - obviously useful information for the Government to know.
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Re: 1939 census

Postby Guy » Thu May 25, 2017 6:59 am

Ashbee wrote:Great, thanks...that confirms that I have all that is available.

Cheers!


Have you looked at the original image on FindMyPast, that contains all the information available?
If you have only looked at the transcription then you may not have all the available information.
Even redacted information may supply information or clues.
There is a redacted entry on the schedule between my Grandfather and Grandmother who I suspect is my Uncle who was killed in the war.
Knowing what I do about my grandfather it would not be a surprise to find he had recorded his son above his wife.
There are clues showing beneath the redaction, a loop in the correct position for the J of his forename John. A very frustrating group of partial letters containing the word cadet. My uncle started his war as a Lieutenant so would be an Officer Cadet in 39.
Many images have additional information on the partially scanned right hand page.

I would also suggest looking beyond the one schedule on the 1939 and indeed census as they may provide information that affected you ancestor’s lives.

For instance I have even been given a clue to a question raised by my wife that I had not asked my mother when she was alive.
Why did she become a Westland Nurse before she married?
The answer is there on the 1939, her parents’ house was 60 Holly Walk and a further up the street were a couple of nursing homes at numbers 50 & 54, with medical staff in other houses in the road.
Given that Westland Nurses were in at least one of those nursing homes it is not such a surprise that she chose that occupation, one of her sisters also became a doctor, possible for the same reasons.

Cheers
Guy
As we have gained from the past, we owe the future a debt, which we pay by sharing today.
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Re: 1939 census

Postby Ashbee » Thu May 25, 2017 7:39 am

All good points and worth remembering. I do have a copy of the original rather than the transcript and found one or two other helpful bits of information too but now have a few more questions than I started with! Such as, where was my grandmother? Why wasn't she with grandad? I asked my mum and got a curt 'she was always running off with some man according to my aunt'!!! All long dead now so no way to work out what any of that meant or to track gran down. All part and parcel of family history! :lol:
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Re: 1939 census

Postby Guy » Fri May 26, 2017 7:40 am

Ashbee wrote:All good points and worth remembering. I do have a copy of the original rather than the transcript and found one or two other helpful bits of information too but now have a few more questions than I started with! Such as, where was my grandmother? Why wasn't she with grandad? I asked my mum and got a curt 'she was always running off with some man according to my aunt'!!! All long dead now so no way to work out what any of that meant or to track gran down. All part and parcel of family history! :lol:


One way to discover people who are not where they should be is to use the advanced search option (top right hand corner of the search box).

Try using the less is more technique, i.e. try a surname first then if too many results are returned add the first letter of a forename. (Try using name variants ticked and name variants not ticked)

Just add or change search options until manageable results are returned.
You could even put other relations (grandparents, cousins, married sisters) in the Other Householders Names box to see if that helps.

The advanced search gives a wide choice to search on.

Cheers
Guy
As we have gained from the past, we owe the future a debt, which we pay by sharing today.
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1939 census

Postby brunes08 » Fri May 26, 2017 8:19 am

Another useful point to remember about the Register is that many people who lived in cities and industrial areas likely to be targets were evacuated to places where you might not expect to find them. I have friends who were evacuated from Liverpool to Wales, others from London and Bristol to Cornwall. Some never returned because their homes had been destroyed. One relative went to stay with other family members in another County away from London. I didn't know that until I had a copy of the originsl. The Register can throw up a lot of puzzles to unravel especially as many children went without parents.
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Re: 1939 census

Postby Ashbee » Fri May 26, 2017 12:59 pm

I wasn't surprised to discover my mum, aged 4, was missing as she'd been evacuated to Hertfordshire but I had expected nan to be there or etched out as she was born in 1915 and died in 1991, the years used for blanking. But her name is too common and I'm not sure where she would be or with whom if, as the rumour went, she had run off or if she is actually under a black line somewhere. All the obvious family were exactly where I expected to find them she wasn't with them. I find these snapshots of life fascinating...

The reason I asked was because after 20 years of searching this record actually gave me a date of birth for another family member but I still can't find his birth registration. I wanted to know where he claimed to have been born and realised that wasn't shown and wondered if I'd missed something in my surprise and haste.
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Re: 1939 census

Postby ksouthall » Sat May 27, 2017 7:18 am

Ashbee wrote:I had expected nan to be there or etched out as she was born in 1915 and died in 1991, the years used for blanking.


If she was born in 1915, her record would have been opened now as records are being released as they pass the 100 year mark.

Is it possible the date of birth is held incorrectly on the 1939 Register? I have found several cases of this, where either the day is one or two out (9th instead of 10th) or the year is one or two out.

Have you tried searching for her with date of birth variants?
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