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DIX family of Southwark

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Re: DIX family of Southwark

Postby Sylcec » Thu Sep 01, 2016 10:54 pm

Well now - thank you Ian - I sort of knew that if you got onto this that a solution would emerge! :D

So, firstly, no - the 1866 death is NOT confirmed. I'm afraid that it was one of those speculative finds as fitting other known facts. I'm not even sure why I hung onto it.

I realise now that Robert the father must have died no later than 1854 and possibly much earlier. I will get back on to the search for deaths of him and his wife Sarah. Many, many thanks for pulling together the marriages of the other siblings.

The finding in 1841 of 5 Dix children (not born in county) at what was presumably a private school, certainly looks as if it is the right family of Dixes. I agree that the Norfolk connection is interesting, and this despite the fact that other links so far are from London. For your possible interest, the father of Robert (oil merchant) was John Dix an oil cooper, b. abt 1752 & m. 1777 at St Benet Pauls Wharf, London to Mary Roberts. He dies before 18 April 1823 and leaves a will (made 20 Jan) - everything to daughter Sarah. [Edit] Just identified the correct burial - 1 April 1823, Christ Church Southwark.

Robert Dix's wife Sarah nee Stolworthy inherits in 1815 from her g-father George Weatherstone, a London gent, who owned much property in Holborn, as do her brothers. Her father Edmund (m. 1789 to Ann Weatherstone) was a London Cabinet Maker & Upholsteror (prob made coffins!) Stolworthy is also a name found in Suffolk/Norfolk - but not found any direct links yet. All in all, an interesting family which I am following for a friend.
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Re: DIX family of Southwark

Postby Sylcec » Thu Sep 01, 2016 11:37 pm

An interesting side for anyone following this thread. In some occupation records the phrase "Macassar Oil" was used. I have just looked this up and find it was a hair preparation used by men from the late 18th century. Of especial interest is the info that it was popularised by a famous London Barber by name Alexander Rowland (1747-1823). Alexander Rowland was a friend of George Weatherstone, and one of his executors - discovered last night when I read through a 7 page will. There is clearly more to investigate here.
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Re: DIX family of Southwark

Postby Mick Loney » Fri Sep 02, 2016 7:54 am

Had you never heard of an 'anti-macassar'? This was usually an embroidered piece of material, that was draped over the back of chairs, settees etc, to protect them from staining from the Maccassar oil in peoples hair.:)


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Re: DIX family of Southwark

Postby ianbee » Fri Sep 02, 2016 9:48 pm

Hi Sylvia
In the light of all that, it seems a little surprising that there is no probate for Robert.
In fact, that last baptism - of Edmund - is more or less the last reference to Robert Dix I can find.
He seems to completely disappear. Had he given up business? Moved abroad?

He may have died before 1866, but then who was it that died in Newington that year? I am always a bit suspicious of what is printed in the newspapers, but it has added to the mystery!
All I can tell you about that 1866 death is that the reference - (vol 1d) page 133 - is the first page of deaths for Newington that (June) quarter. The death was in early April (unless it was on the last day of March!), a few of the other nine with that page reference were buried at Victoria Park Cemetery - on the 3rd, 5th and 6th April (for page 134 three burials were found 10, 14, 17 April, one of which was at Nunhead Cemetery)
The death was registered in the sub-district of Trinity Newington.
If I find out anything else about it, I'll let you know.
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Re: DIX family of Southwark

Postby Sylcec » Sat Sep 03, 2016 12:23 am

To Mick - well, yes - I well remember anti-macassars over the backs of arm chairs when visiting elderly folk in my youth. And I think that I knew they were there to protect the backs of chairs from hair preparations. But it was just a word, and I don't recollect ever hearing or knowing what was 'macassar', hence my comments on the interesting links uncovered.

Ian - given that several of Robert & Sarah's adult children were found well north of the Thames, including Yorkshire, has me wondering if Robert himself was travelling north as an Oil Merchant (which I'm now thinking must have been the Macassar Oil). Hence he could have died pretty well anywhere. Back to the drawing board. So, if there was a probate, it may have been through a court other than PCC. Speaking of which, I was more surprised there was no probate for Edmund Stolworthy (d.1844) - but could just be an admon, not indexed.
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