Moderator Control Panel ]

Fradulent registration of births and deaths in the 1840s

Share your thoughts with your fellow family historians – and the Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine team – here

Fradulent registration of births and deaths in the 1840s

Postby ermin79 » Fri Jul 08, 2016 9:46 pm

Whilst trying to ascertain if it might have been possible that a relative of mine died post September 1837 but had no corresponding death registration I came across this article online regarding fradulent registration of births and deaths by registrars in the 1840s, especially in urban areas. He specifically cites trials relating to Liverpool, South Shields and St Marylebone:

http://www.british-jewry.org.uk/PPark.pdf

I find it interesting that at the time of writing (2010) the author states he had ordered certificates which were known to be fictitious (their details having been released at trial) yet there were no corresponding notes on the index or certificate to suggest this was the case. My family all seem to be rural dwellers but this is evidently another hurdle to be negotiated for some researchers to ensure they're on the right track.
ermin79
 
Posts: 194
Joined: Tue Dec 24, 2013 2:25 pm

Re: Fradulent registration of births and deaths in the 1840s

Postby AdrianB38 » Fri Jul 08, 2016 11:50 pm

How very interesting....

The bit about methods of working is of interest to me, as I have found a major lack of birth registrations with relatives in the Alsager area of Cheshire in the 1840s. Births in nearby Haslington and Nantwich, on the other hand, seem to be pretty much always registered. Nantwich was a town with its own Registrar, Haslington was a compact village. Alsager, however, was both scattered and some distance from its Registrar in Sandbach. So if they had to go round knocking on doors almost, no wonder Alsager got missed a bit.

Sent from my MotoG3 using WDYTYA Forum mobile app
Adrian
AdrianB38
 
Posts: 2536
Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 4:07 pm

Re: Fradulent registration of births and deaths in the 1840s

Postby ermin79 » Sat Jul 09, 2016 8:13 am

I didn't even envisage registrar's coming out to villages and towns. I had imagined that people were travelling to register births and deaths, or that a burial would be somehow registered through the church as marriages would be. However a relatively new scheme combined with lack of time and resources to travel to a registrars office in a nearby town (plus fines imposed on the registrar not the informant) would likely have meant people had no imperative to travel to register the event themselves.
ermin79
 
Posts: 194
Joined: Tue Dec 24, 2013 2:25 pm

Fradulent registration of births and deaths in the 1840s

Postby Mick Loney » Sat Jul 09, 2016 6:49 pm

One has to remember that in the early days, it was the registrars responsibility to register BM&Ds. Which I think explains why so many went unrecorded, and to be honest, I can't imagine how they could achieve their aim without assistants to help.
In hindsght, it is a miracle they achieved what they did.


Sent from my iPad using WDYTYA Forum
Mick Loney
 
Posts: 673
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2011 11:39 am

Re: Fradulent registration of births and deaths in the 1840s

Postby Sylcec » Wed Jul 13, 2016 10:53 pm

Absolutely fascinating. Many thanks for bringing the article to our attention.
User avatar
Sylcec
 
Posts: 2509
Joined: Sun Aug 17, 2008 4:36 pm
Location: Sydney, Australia


Return to Genealogy chat


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests