Moderator Control Panel ]

Did some of the Royal Scots Fusiliers not go to war?

Having trouble tracking down a wartime ancestor? Share your queries – and help fellow researchers – here

Did some of the Royal Scots Fusiliers not go to war?

Postby Byron130 » Wed Aug 06, 2014 1:16 pm

Hi,
I'm looking at my grandad's certificate of service book which states he was in the army from 1942 - 1956. He was born and raised in Bradford and from what I know he was stationed in York around 1950 where he met and married my nana.

The problem I have come across is this;
I have photos of two of his friends who were in The Royal Scots Fusiliers and who died on the same day, 26th June 1944 in Normandy and who are buried in France (the photos are of his friends and their graves) but i've recently discovered that my grandad was ALSO in The Royal Scots Fusiliers so i'm now confused as to why there has never been any mention of my grandad going to war or being in the war.

I really don't know enough about the military to have even the vaguest idea as to whether some soldiers were sent overseas and others were not (or why) so i'm hoping someone could give me a clue? My mom says there was no talk of him ever being sent away to war, he'd never mentioned it and she's sure he would have, so could he have stayed in Britain when others were being sent off?

His service record is this:
General Service Corps 04.12.42 - 04.12.42 Fusilier - War Medal 1939/1945
Class ‘W’ (T) Army Reserve 05.12.42 - 20.01.43 Fusilier
General Service Corps 21.01.43 - 02.03.43 Fusilier
Highland Regiment 03.03.43 - 06.07.43 Fusilier
Royal Scots Fusiliers 07.07.43 - 30.10.45 Fusilier
6th Battalion Devon Regiment 31.10.45 - 24.07.45 Fusilier
Class “L” (could be “Z”) (T) Army Reserve 25.07.47 - 27.04.50 Fusilier
Green Howards (Home) 28.04.50 - 10.01.52
Green Howards (B.O.A.R) 11.01.52 - 25.03.52
Duke of Wellingtons (Home) 26.03.52 - 21.10.56

I'm not sure what he did as a fusilier but the fact he was in the same reg as his friends who died and in the same time period is really niggling me.

Can anyone shed any light on this please? I'll be very grateful if you can.
User avatar
Byron130
 
Posts: 92
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2009 8:20 pm

Re: Did some of the Royal Scots Fusiliers not go to war?

Postby coopernicola » Wed Aug 06, 2014 2:06 pm

He could have been ill or injured prior to embarkation and thus not gone with is battalion. This happened to the father a friend of mine, who broke his leg falling from a gang plank. He didn't rejoin his battalion who suffered tragic losses during WWII.
You may find if you include his name and service number some of the forum members can trace him.
User avatar
coopernicola
 
Posts: 701
Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 12:11 pm

Re: Did some of the Royal Scots Fusiliers not go to war?

Postby coopernicola » Wed Aug 06, 2014 2:23 pm

To give you an idea of the fusiliers in general try rogerwaters.org, one of the band Pink Floyd, whose father was in the Royal Fusiliers during WWII. Of course there is also the fusiliers museum in Lancashire too.
User avatar
coopernicola
 
Posts: 701
Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 12:11 pm

Re: Did some of the Royal Scots Fusiliers not go to war?

Postby Byron130 » Wed Aug 06, 2014 2:54 pm

Thank you coopernicola, I’ve never heard that my grandad was ever injured but I’ve just been looking into what the ‘Class’ bit means from his service record; apparently an Army order was introduced in June 1916 stating that Class W (T) Army Reserve (and a few other classes) was “for all soldiers whose services are deemed to be more valuable to the country in civil rather than military employment”.

I know he worked as an engineer after the war and his service record also says “equipment repairer” so I guess that could be good enough reason that he was more valuable here than in France? I’ll take a look into searching for his name and service number too though; Joseph Edward Morley. Army Number 22522587.

Thanks again for your help.
User avatar
Byron130
 
Posts: 92
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2009 8:20 pm

Re: Did some of the Royal Scots Fusiliers not go to war?

Postby AdrianB38 » Wed Aug 06, 2014 10:34 pm

You need to understand that any infantry regiment is split into battalions and that the battalions can be all over the place. So the history of one RSF soldier in his battalion can be radically different from another's history.

I don't have any understanding of how many battalions the RSF raised during WW2 but there is every chance that some could have been employed only on home defence duties - or at least, only on home defence while your GF was in the regiment. In addition, other soldiers would be employed training new recruits and administering the regiment and its manpower (regimental HQ, alias The Depot, never moved - it was always in the UK). So there are all sorts of possible reasons why your GF never left the UK during WW2. Quite how soldiers were chosen for such home duties, I've no idea but I think we can guess that the short-sighted, mildly unfit but numerate types might have been directed towards administration. Equally, soldiers chosen as trainers would be highly competent at whatever specialism they were teaching. It does sound like your GF was doing something technical but I don't have any handle on exactly how regiments deployed their technical specialists. (I'd have thought that much of the technical expertise would have been held in the Royal Engineers or Royal Signals).

If that Service Record is a full extract, then the fact that he only has a War Medal 1939-45 and none of the Stars (which are usually dedicated to specific theatres of operation), seems to confirm that he didn't leave the UK until 1952 when he spent a couple of months in Germany in the Green Howards attached to BAOR (British Army Of the Rhine).

I'm not familiar with patterns of recruitment in WW2 but as far as the short time in Class W Reserve goes, that's possibly something like one day (4 Dec 1942) in the Army on his formal day of recruitment, then "Go home sonny and we'll call you in a few weeks for your basic training".

And I have no idea why he was in the Reserves (i.e. back in Civvy Street) 1947 to 1950, then back in uniform 1950-56. Except that the Korean War was 1950-53, so was his recall a result of that need for extra manpower starting 1950? Especially if he had much-needed technical skills.
Adrian
AdrianB38
 
Posts: 2514
Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 4:07 pm

Re: Did some of the Royal Scots Fusiliers not go to war?

Postby Byron130 » Thu Aug 07, 2014 11:20 am

Wow! Thank you Adrian!

What you've said makes sense and I'm beginning to think he was just extremely lucky to be needed here instead of over there. As I knew nothing about the army and all the different battalions it would also make sense that he may never have been in the same battalion as his mates either.

I'm going to read more on the uk military of WW1 & 2 but thank you for you time in responding. It's a great help and very much appreciated.


Sent from my iPhone using WDYTYA Forum
User avatar
Byron130
 
Posts: 92
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2009 8:20 pm


Return to Military help


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest