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Chris Paton (Scottish ancestors)

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Re: Chris Paton

Postby hsjob » Fri Jul 18, 2014 4:52 am

Can you please recommend any resources for researching families on Islay in the 18th century? I am descended from the McAlpine family.
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Re: Chris Paton

Postby ChrisPaton1 » Fri Jul 18, 2014 11:59 am

Hi everyone, looking forward to getting under way shortly! Just a quick note that I have written several books on Irish, Scottish and UK wide based family history research, so for anything I can't help with here, you may find some assistance in those - a list of the titles is available on my blog at http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html

Chris
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Re: Chris Paton

Postby Jon Bauckham » Fri Jul 18, 2014 12:01 pm

Hello folks!

Thank you to everyone who has posted a query and thank you to Chris, who has very kindly agreed to come on to the forum and impart his wisdom. If you would like to ask some further questions, do feel free – Chris will be here for the next hour and try to plough through as many as possible!

Jon
I've now left Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine. Please contact wdytyaeditorial@immediate.co.uk regarding any forum queries.
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Re: Chris Paton

Postby ChrisPaton1 » Fri Jul 18, 2014 12:01 pm

dfgrty wrote:Seeking information about:
Andrew McKay (Mackay)


Dale, the place of birth does look like Govan from what I can see on the certificate, but Govan is not in Ayrshire (also stated on the cert), it is in Renfrewshire - so there may be an issue about the quality of the informant's information. Until clarified, I would consider initially targeting both Girvan in Ayrshire, and Govan in Renfrewshire. Andrew's birth or baptism is not appearing on ScotlandsPeople, which means either it was not recorded for some reason, or that he was not Church of Scotland or Roman Catholic (these being the only churches represented on ScotlandsPeople). I would try to see what other religious denominations existed in Govan and Girvan by consulting the Statistical Accounts of Scotland website at http://stat-acc-scot.edina.ac.uk/sas/sa ... &passback= . The cert also states that Andrew was in Victoria for 30 years, so he should be in Scotland (or possibly elsewhere in Britain) for the 1841 and/or 1851 censuses, so it would be worth searching for him there - he has quite a common name, but his age should help to narrow down candidates. Bear in mind the 1841 census rounded down adult ages to the nearest multiple of 5 for those aged over 15. Unlock the Past in Adelaide has printed a book written by me entitled Discover Scottish Church Records, which is also available as an ebook, which may also help with some further ideas (see http://www.gould.com.au/Discover-Scotti ... tp0281.htm).
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Re: Chris Paton

Postby ChrisPaton1 » Fri Jul 18, 2014 12:02 pm

rtstodd wrote:Have hit a brick wall with James Stewart/Stuart who was Town Sergeant and Provosts Officer in Aberdeen.


Richard, the local family history society Aberdeen and North East Scotland FHS (http://www.anesfhs.org.uk) has one of the best family history research centres in Scotland, so I would drop them a note to see if they can help – they may be able to locate a monumental inscription for him, for example, from his grave, if it has been transcribed, which might provide family details. In addition, if the parish records are failing, bear in mind that other churches not represented on ScotlandsPeople existed at that time in Aberdeen, most noticeably the Scottish Episcopal Church, which was fairly strong in the area, with many of its records held at the local Aberdeen City and Aberdeenshire Archives (http://www.aberdeencity.gov.uk/archives). Land records such as sasines and inheritance records such as the Services of Heirs may also help in identifying other family members – the National Records of Scotland has several useful guides on these at http://www.nas.gov.uk/guides/default.asp.
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Re: Chris Paton

Postby ChrisPaton1 » Fri Jul 18, 2014 12:03 pm

ScottH wrote:Until now I've done all research online, mainly via Scotland's People. I'm visiting Edinburgh in a few weeks time so wondering if you have any tips on how I can take my research further at the Scotland's People Centre, National Records of Scotland etc. I'd like to "add flesh to the bones", finding more stories and information on individuals as well as taking lines further back.


Scott, my main suggestion here is to consult the websites of both the ScotlandsPeople Centre (http://www.scotlandspeoplehub.gov.uk) and the National Records of Scotland (http://www.nas.gov.uk) prior to your visit, as both have detailed guides on the various types of records that they hold – the ScotlandsPeople Centre has a library of books on site, for example, including monumental inscriptions, which may be useful and which are outlined on the site under the 'Research' tab. In particular, I would also carry out searches for individuals on the NRS catalogue in advance, as some of your ancestors may well pop up – but be warned that not all records are held on site and may need to be ordered in advance (another reason to do such searches before you visit the NRS!). If you are stuck for time, I would usually start with the kirk session registers for the parishes of interest, which have been digitised but not indexed – you'll find various things recorded in these from payments to the church to full blown investigations of antenuptial fornication! – and the sasines records (land transfer records) that have been indexed by computer from approximately 1780-1868. I would also plunder the National Library of Scotland website at http://www.nls.uk prior to your visit – it has all sorts of goodies, including free to access post-office directories, and the British Newspaper Archive (http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk), as there may be records held at the NRS relating to any stories you might find there – its Scottish coverage is getting better by the day.
Last edited by ChrisPaton1 on Fri Jul 18, 2014 12:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Chris Paton

Postby ChrisPaton1 » Fri Jul 18, 2014 12:04 pm

Madgie wrote:My greatgrandfather Henry James (sometimes Harry) was born 1831 or 1835 on the Island of Jura. His father William Clement James was an Excise Officer. The above dates, place of birth, father's name and occupation come from marriage certificate 1877 (Northants), censuses (1881, 1891, 1901), death certificate, all having him living in either Bucks or Northants. Excise and Customs have no record of him (he may have been temporary). Also there appears to be no trace of him on Jura (I hired a Scottish genealogist 12 years ago to search). He is my reinforced concrete wall, and would appreciate any nudges in a more profitable direction, PLEASE.


Madgie, I'm not sure which excise records you may have searched, but Scotland has separate records to those held at the National Archives at Kew – the National Records of Scotland has a guide to Customs and Excise Records holdings across the country at http://www.nas.gov.uk/onlineCatalogue/. Jura itself is a beautiful island, located to the north of Islay, and was also the name of the parish - a near contemporary account of the island's make up from the time of Harry's presence there will be found in the 2nd Statistical Account at http://stat-acc-scot.edina.ac.uk/sas/sa ... &passback=. This also provides details of the landowners on the island – if their estate papers are accessible these may be worth consulting for mentions of Harry's father. I would also normally suggest checking the kirk session records, but those from Jura appear only to have survived from 1850 onwards. I would also contact Argyll and Bute's Archives at http://www.argyll-bute.gov.uk/community ... e/archives for further advice on any holdings they may have at Lochgilphead. There's also a blog based site for genealogy on Jura at www.jurainfo.com/blog/genealogy/jura-ge ... -ancestors, which includes a Jura email list.
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Re: Chris Paton

Postby ChrisPaton1 » Fri Jul 18, 2014 12:05 pm

ewanarm wrote:Have hit a brick wall with my great great great grandfather William Armstrong, born 1814 in Roxburghshire. Married Susan Tait also born around 1814 but cannot find a marriage anywhere. Also cannot find births or baptisms for either. Appear in the 1841 Census in Yetholm and in subsequent censuses in Scotland and England. William was a land agent who moved around a bit before settling in Bishop Auckland.

My great great grandfather was their eldest son William Armstrong. Parish record of in the parish register of Edrom, Berwickshire lists the births of all their children. Was wondering if you could give me any advice on where to go next.


Ewan, in terms of their marriage record, I would check the kirk session records for both Yetholm and Edrom, as it is possible that the couple married irregularly by declaration in front of a witness or witnesses, and were then hauled up before the session to repent for doing so (and in so doing, creating a record of the marriage, should there be any doubters!). Irregular marriage, perfectly legal in Scotland up to 1940, was very common in the Borders, a sore point for many of the churches based there as they lost income every time someone went off to Edinburgh or somewhere else to do so. The kirk session records have been digitised and can be accessed at the National Records of Scotland – I believe they may also be accessible at the Hawick Heritage Hub. I would also check for nonconformist churches in the area by consulting the Statistical Accounts for the parishes at http://stat-acc-scot.edina.ac.uk/sas/sa ... &passback=. The Borders Family History Society is worth touching base with at www.bordersfhs.org.uk.
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Re: Chris Paton

Postby ChrisPaton1 » Fri Jul 18, 2014 12:05 pm

33hannahg wrote:My granddad is Scottish and his family members are very few ,so tracing my family from Scotland is hard ,especially as Scotland's people is an expense I couldn't afford to keep paying to keep getting wrong answers ,my great granddad is James Coburn born 1905, GLASGOW CITY/LANARK, died 18/10/1988 in Ayrshire, I have been trying to find his mum and dad,and his siblings if possible the information I have is his birth mum was Jessie coburn ,but in his marriage to Margaret Hamilton his mum and dad was named William coburn and Marion coburn, maiden name bell ,I would appreciate any help at all


Only one James Coburn is noted on ScotlandsPeople as having been born in Scotland between 1903-1907, and it was in Glasgow. You can purchase the record from www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk. If he died in Ayrshire in 1988, his date of birth should be included on his death certificate – because of the online closure period for access of 50 years for deaths, the death will only be indexed on ScotlandsPeople, and you will therefore need to order a copy of the certificate from the centre at a cost of £12. Hopefully the date of birth on both documents should match, and if so, you should be able to confirm his parents' names from the birth certificate, as one of them will likely have been the informant. If you know where James was resident in Scotland in September 1939, you can also apply for a copy of his National Identity Register registration at a cost of £15 – this should include his date of birth, providing further information for corroboration. See http://www.gro-scotland.gov.uk/famrec/h ... ister.html on how to do so.
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Re: Chris Paton

Postby ChrisPaton1 » Fri Jul 18, 2014 12:05 pm

HeidiC wrote:Hello, I'm looking for my William Hamilton, b. 1799. According to his gravestone, born in Glasgow. Went to Prince Edward Island. There are three William Hamiltons born in Lanarkshire in 1799 according to Scottish Church Records. How do I find out which William is mine? Thanks!


Heidi, it may not be quite as simple as just looking at ScotlandsPeople to see how many William Hamiltons there are, because this site only hosts records from the Church of Scotland, and he may well have been born to a nonconformist family. I'm afraid in such situations the answer almost always lies in the adopted home, through an obituary or some other record. You could check the names of the children and try to predict the names of his parents from the Scottish naming pattern, if he adhered to it – the eldest son being named after the father's father, and the second daughter after the father's mother. Look for other Hamiltons in the immediate area where your William settled also, in case of chain migration – they may provide a useful clue that William does not. You could also try to “kill off” the three William Hamiltons that you have found in Glasgow, to see what became of them, to narrow down the possibilities. David Dobson and Donald Whyte have produced books of information concerning Scots who emigrated, including information extracted from many emigration societies - many of these are now hosted on Ancestry, which may provide additional possibilities.
Last edited by ChrisPaton1 on Fri Jul 18, 2014 12:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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