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TEETH

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TEETH

Postby fizzyrock » Mon Nov 26, 2007 12:46 am

Could anyone enlighten me as to what it meant if you died of TEETH. I have the parish burial records for Sculcoates in Hull for 1792 - 1812 and alot of people died (mainly children) of teeth.
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RE: TEETH

Postby Sandy60 » Mon Nov 26, 2007 10:10 pm

Hi fizzyrock
Just a thought, but could it be that the people you mentioned actually died from infected teeth. In those days dentistry was non-existant and poor diet led to gum disease and subsequent infected and broken teeth. These long term infections led to septicaemia and as no treatment (except the local "nurse") was available many died. Sometimes the certifying person at the time used a blanket term to cover deaths that would have a different diagnosis now.
Hope this is useful
Sandy
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RE: TEETH

Postby margaretabram » Tue Nov 27, 2007 1:13 am

You are right about infected teeth being a cause of death. Untreated abcessed teeth form abcesses in the actual jawbone and the infection in the bone caused people to die.

The other thing to remember with children (babies and toddlers) is that teething was blamed for all sorts of symptons. Even now teething is blamed for fevers, stomach upsets and colds. Then, an infection that now you would get antibiotics for, could kill small children. In ignorance of the child's illness, the death would be recorded as "teething" or "teeth".

Mags

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RE: TEETH

Postby fizzyrock » Thu Nov 29, 2007 4:20 am

Thanks for that, did think about teething, the ages of the people were quite young. Makes you wonder about the wonders of medicine nowadays!
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RE: TEETH

Postby paulberyl » Fri Nov 30, 2007 12:53 am

As has already been identified teething was a recognised cause of death in the 18th and 19th centuries for infants. Infants were more prone to disease at the time of teething and resuling symptoms were restlessness, fretfullness, convulsions, diarrhoea and painful, swollen gums. Convulsions, diarrhoea and the treatment of swollen gums (lancing) could very easily lead to death.

In addition 19th century working class mothers were too busy to fully care for their children and when teething the babies were given smoothing syrups - syrups which contained heroin and morphine and which could also contribute to deaths in infants.

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